Worcestershire Place Names

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H. Frowde, 1905 - English language - 185 pages
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Page 36 - The said church took the name of the well, and the well took the name of the parish clerks in London, who of old time were accustomed there yearly to assemble, and to play some large history of Holy Scripture...
Page 99 - A less universal but equally peculiar feature of the open field system in hilly districts is the ' lynch,' and it may often be observed remaining when every other trace of an open field has been removed by enclosure. Its right of survival lies in its indestructibility. (When a hill-side formed part of the open field the strips almost always were made to run, not up and down the hill, but horizontally along it ; and in ploughing, the custom for ages was always to turn the sod of the furrow downhill,)...
Page 99 - ... was always to turn the sod of the furrow downhill, the plough consequently always returning one way idle. If the whole hillside were ploughed in one field, this would result in a gradual travelling of the soil from the top to the bottom of the field, and it might not be noticed. But as in the open field system the hillside was ploughed in strips with unploughed balks between them, no sod could pass in the ploughing from one strip to the next; but the process of moving the sod downwards would...
Page 99 - If the whole hill-side were ploughed in one field, this would result in a gradual travelling of the soil from the top to the bottom of the field, and it might not be noticed. But as in the open field system the hill-side was ploughed in strips with unploughed balks between them, no sod could pass in the ploughing from one strip to the next ; but the process of moving the sod downwards would go on age after age just the same within each individual strip. In other words, every year's ploughing took...
Page 4 - Hearken ye, my friends. I desire that my wife hold this land which I bought from the church so long as she lives; and after her death let the church from which I received it receive it back; and let him who takes it from the church be excommunicate'.
Page 121 - It was built by one who had acquired a large fortune as a baker. He was not ashamed of the trade by the profits of which he had become " a prosperous gentleman," and therefore resolved to call his residence by a name having reference to his former occupation. The " Pale " is the name given to the long wooden shovel on which the bread is placed in order to be pushed into the oven. SACK WINE.
Page 172 - White-stone, is called from a white stone or cross erected there ; and that in William the Conqueror's time this stone was pulled down, and used to build a lavatory for the monks of St. Mary*. In Green's " History of Worcester,
Page 129 - wite.' That a man buy not out of port. 12. And we have ordained : that no man buy any property out of port over XX. pence ; but let him buy there within, on the witness of the port-reeve, or of another unlying man : or further, on the witness of the reeves at the folk-mote. Of repairing of 'burhs.
Page 19 - ... chamber over, an inner room, closets, with loft over, a study, with shelves cut for books, and another opening in the rock, either for a belfry or chimney. Small and rudely cut openings in the rock served for windows. In the front of the cell is a seat carved in the rock, from which the hermit looked forth on the Severn (which then ran closer to the rock than it does now) and the beautiful meadows and wooded banks adjacent. There is a tradition that this was at one time a smuggler's cave ; it...
Page 37 - a broad way or glade in a wood, through which woodcocks, etc., might dart or 'shoot,' so as to be caught by nets stretched across the opening.

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