Remembering Constantine at the Milvian Bridge

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 29, 2011 - History
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Constantine's victory in 312 at the battle of the Milvian Bridge established his rule as the first Christian emperor. This book examines the creation and dissemination of the legends about that battle and its significance. Christian histories, panegyrics and an honorific arch at Rome soon commemorated his victory, and the emperor himself contributed to the myth by describing his vision of a cross in the sky before the battle. Through meticulous research into the late Roman narratives and the medieval and Byzantine legends, this book moves beyond a strictly religious perspective by emphasizing the conflicts about the periphery of the Roman empire, the nature of emperorship and the role of Rome as a capital city. Throughout late antiquity and the medieval period, memories of Constantine's victory served as a powerful paradigm for understanding rulership in a Christian society.
 

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Contents

Visions of Constantine 7
7
The Afterlife of Constantine 7
19
Ecclesiastical Histories 7
33
Constantines Memories 7
56
Eusebius Commentary 7
82
Shaping Memories in the West 7
101
Rome after the Battle 7
155
Backward and Forward 7
219
The Bridge 7
253
editions and translations 259 bibliography
267
index
289
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Raymond Van Dam is a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Michigan. His most recent publications are Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History during Late Antiquity (2010) and The Roman Revolution of Constantine (Cambridge University Press, 2007).

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