The Zebrafish in Biomedical Research: Biology, Husbandry, Diseases, and Research Applications

Front Cover
Samuel Cartner, Judith S. Eisen, Susan F. Farmer, Karen J. Guillemin, Michael L. Kent, George E. Sanders
Elsevier Science, Dec 6, 2019 - Science - 718 pages

The Zebrafish in Biomedical Research: Biology, Husbandry, Diseases, and Research Applications is a comprehensive work that fulfills a critical need for a thorough compilation of information on this species. The text provides significant updates for working vivarium professionals maintaining zebrafish colonies, veterinarians responsible for their care and well-being, zoologists and ethologists studying the species, and investigators using the species to gain critical insights into human physiology and disease. As the zebrafish has become an important model organism for the study of vertebrate development and disease, organ function, behavior, toxicology, cancer, and drug discovery, this book presents an important resource for future research.



  • Presents a complete view of the zebrafish, covering their biology, husbandry, diseases and research applications
  • Includes the work of world-renowned authors
  • Provides the first authoritative and comprehensive treatment of zebrafish in biomedical research as part of the ACLAM series

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2019)

Samuel Cartner, D.V. M., Ph.D., is the Assistant Vice President for Animal Research Services and Director of the Animal Resources Program (ARP) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). He received his DVM from Auburn College of Veterinary Medicine and PhD from UAB. Dr. Cartner has served in multiple roles with organizations that promote premium laboratory animal care. Dr. Cartner is a faculty member in the Department of Genetics. His research interest includes genetic susceptibility to infectious disease, and the development of animal models of human and animal disease. Recently Dr. Cartner has focused on investigations that lead to improvements of laboratory animal care and use.

Judith S. Eisen, Ph.D., earned her Doctorate at Brandeis University. She is a professor at the University of Oregon and a member of the Institute of Neuroscience at Oregon. The focus of Eisen's research is to understand the mechanisms underlying development and function of the vertebrate nervous system. Eisen uses zebrafish in her research.

Susan C. Farmer, DVM, Ph.D., is the Senior Clinical Veterinarian and Co-Director of the Zebrafish Research Facility at the University of Alabama. Services offered by the facility are husbandry, larviculture, cryopreservation and research support. Dr. Farmer have her DVM degree from Mississippi State University and her Ph.D. in Pathology/Experimental Pathology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Karen Guillemin, Ph.D., earned her Doctorate at Stanford University. She is a Professor at the University of Oregon and a member of the Institute of Molecular Biology at Oregon. Dr. Guillemin studies host-microbe interactions in development and disease, and uses zebrafish in her research.

Michael Kent, Ph.D., is a Professor of Microbiology at Oregon State University in the College of Veterinary Medicine. Kent's lab focuses on two major research areas: diseases of zebrafish in research facilities and impacts of pathogens on wild salmonid fishes. Dr. Kent is also a co-PI at the Zebrafish International Resource Center where he assists with health studies and their diagnostic service.

George E. Sanders, DVM, M.S., is certified as a Fish Pathologist by the American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section, a Senior Lecturer, and the Aquatic Animal Program Director for the Department of Comparative Medicine at the University of Washington. He provides multiple resources, program development, facility and systems design, training, instruction, regulatory compliance, and coordinates veterinary care and pathology for all aquatic research animals. Dr. Sanders received his DVM from Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine and his Masters of Science in Comparative Medicine from the Department of Comparative Medicine at the University of Washington.

Bibliographic information