The Dialogue Or Communing Between the Wise King Salomon and Marcolphus

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Edward Gordon Duff
Lawrence & Bullen, 1892 - Incunabula - 46 pages
 

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Page xvi - ... das, wan ich nit czu Dutsche bas mochte gewenden das Latin, dass ess behilde das daden sin. " Ye have often well understood how, in every land, one finds the wise man by the side of the fool : he now that would willingly hear, to him will I relate a strange tale, which no man can take ill. I sat within my cell, and found a book that was [written in] Latin : in the same book I found many words which do not sound polite in the German tongue. I pray old and young that read [the story] as it stands...
Page xxiv - Gerard de Leew a man of grete wysedom in all maner of kunnyng : whych nowe is come from lyfe unto the deth, which is grete harme for many a poure man. On whos sowle god almyghty for hys hygh grace haue mercy. Amen.
Page xi - He is allowed as a favour to choose his own tree, and consequently he wanders with his guards through the Vale of Josaphath to Jericho, over Jordan, through Arabia and the wilderness to the Red Sea, but "never more could Marcolf find a tree that he wold choose to hang on.
Page xiv - where no man may step with feet", contends in argument with Solomon From a remote period forms of the dialogue seem to have been known in England, and two very early versions, under the title of "Solomon and Saturnus", are still in existence . . . The first part consists of Solomon's elaborate explanation of the Pater Noster, setting forth the power and value of the individual letters in a manner which, to a modern reader, would seem to require wisdom even greater than Solomon's to understand. The...
Page xxiii - The History of Jason, The History of Knight Paris and the Fair Vienne, The Dialogue of Solomon and Marcolphus...
Page 15 - Part fell to me from the heart of a vulture Hence I am to be compared to the king in prudence." This reference to the way Marcolph obtained his wisdom is hardly intelligible without the full explanation from the Dialogue: "SALOMON. How comyth to the alle this wysedome and subtyltye? MARCOLFUS. In the tyme of king dauid youre fadyr there was a yonge man his phisician, and as he onys had takyn a vulture for to occupye in his medicins, and had takyn therof that was to hym expedyent, so toke youre modyr...
Page 31 - It happenyd that the next nyght folowyng fyll a great snowe. Marcolphus toke a lytyll cyve or temse in his oon hande and a foot of a bere in the othre hande, and he turnyd hys shoes that stode forwardes upon his feet bakward. And upon the mornyng erly he began to go lyke a beste upon alle...
Page 33 - ... wythoute the citie, and through the vale of iosaphath and ovyr the hyghte of the hylle of olyuete from thens to iericho and cowde fynde no tre that marcolf wolde chese to be hangyd on. From thens wente they ovyr the flome iordane and alle arabye through, and so forth all the great wyldernesse unto the rede see. And nevyrmore cowde marcolph fynde a tre that he wolde chese to hange on. And thus he askapyd out of the dawnger and handes of king Salomon, and turnyd agen unto hys howse, and levyd in...
Page 5 - Polica gat polycana, and thys is my wyf Polycana. Salomon sayde I haue herd of the that thou kanst right wele clatre and speke, and that thou art subtyle of wyt although that thou be mysshapyn and chorlyssh. Lete us have betwene us altercac[i]on. I shal make questyons to the, and thou shalt therto answere.
Page xiii - ... England, Saturnus, the contest becomes one between inspired and infernal wisdom ; and a manifest connection is found between the Eastern allegory and the earliest forms of the legend in the West, in which Saturnus, earl of a country "where no man may step with feet", contends in argument with Solomon From a remote period forms of the dialogue seem to have been known in England, and two very early versions, under the title of "Solomon and Saturnus...

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