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Books Books 1 - 10 of 10 on Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go, if we would find out the heart....
" Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go, if we would find out the heart of a man ; descending into which is as descending a spiral stair in a shaft, without any end, and where that endlessness is only concealed by the spiralness of the stair,... "
Pierre, Or, The Ambiguities - Page 389
by Herman Melville - 1852 - 495 pages
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Herman Melville, Mariner and Mystic

Raymond Melbourne Weaver - Novelists, American - 1921 - 385 pages
...most recent findings in psychology. "Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go," Melville says, "if we would find out the heart of a man; descending...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft." In the winding ambiguities of Pierre Melville attempts to reveal man's fatal facility at self-deception;...
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Herman Melville, Mariner and Mystic

Raymond Melbourne Weaver - Novelists, American - 1921 - 385 pages
...most recent findings in psychology. "Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go," Melville says, "if we would find out the heart of a man; descending...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft." In the winding ambiguities of Pierre Melville attempts to reveal man's fatal facility at self-deception;...
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On Melville

Louis J. Budd, Edwin Harrison Cady - Literary Criticism - 1988 - 277 pages
...me and my chimney, that I and my chimney will never surrender.” Again in Pierre Melville writes: “Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go,...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft.” 12 So Melville in his writing, like the poet Lombardo in Mardi, “got deeper and deeper into himself.”...
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Some Other World to Find: Quest and Negation in the Works of Herman Melville

Bruce Leonard Grenberg - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 240 pages
...dismays the narrator. To “find out the heart of a man,” as Melville's narrator attempts with Pierre, is “as descending a spiral stair in a shaft, without...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft” (P, XXI, ii: 288—89). Ultimately for Melville, the self, or soul, exists without points of external...
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Of Memory, Reminiscence, and Writing: On the Verge

David Farrell Krell - Philosophy - 1990 - 340 pages
...(§458), contains its own obscure shafts, multiple shafts Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper we must go, if we would find out the heart of a man; descending...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft in which intelligence inevitably finds and loses itself. Early in "The Pit and the Pyramid" Derrida...
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American Literature and the Destruction of Knowledge: Innovative Writing in ...

Ronald E. Martin - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 391 pages
...faceless as the whale. And the springs of Pierre's behavior are well beyond where any interpreter can go: “Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go,...of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft.żż** All knowledge leads back to the self, the Pierre narrator claims in another passage, and the self is...
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Cast by Means of Figures: Herman Melville's Rhetorical Development

Bryan Collier Short - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 206 pages
...body is there!—appallingly vacant as vast is the soul of a man!" (285) A few pages later, he writes, "Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go,...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft" (288-89); and still later, "There now, do you see the soul. In its germ on all sides it is closely...
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The Weaver-God, He Weaves: Melville and the Poetics of the Novel

Christopher Sten - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1996 - 361 pages
...become Lucy's suitor. "Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go," Melville says mysteriously, "if we would find out the heart of a man; descending...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft." What makes the news of cousin Glen's suit especially galling to Pierre is the recognition that his...
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The Weaver-God, He Weaves: Melville and the Poetics of the Novel

Christopher Sten - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1996 - 361 pages
...become Lucy's suitor. "Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go," Melville says mysteriously, "if we would find out the heart of a man; descending...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft." What makes the news of cousin Glen's suit especially galling to Pierre is the recognition that his...
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Melville: A Biography

Laurie Robertson-Lorant - Biography & Autobiography - 1998 - 710 pages
...lid—and nobody is there!-appallingly vacant as vast is the soul of man!” 64 Pierre ends in darkness: “Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper must we go,...spiralness of the stair, and the blackness of the shaft” In this abyss, there is no God to say, “Let there be light' These waters are whaleless waters where...
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