The Sacred Balance: Rediscovering Our Place in Nature

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Allen & Unwin, Feb 1, 2008 - Nature - 368 pages
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In the ten years since The Sacred Balance was first published, global warming has become a major issue as glaciers and polar ice caps have begun to melt at an alarming rate, populations of polar bears have dwindled, the intensity of hurricanes and tsunamis has drastically increased, coral bleaching is occurring globally, and the earth has experienced its hottest years in over four centuries. In this new and extensively revised and amplified edition of his best-selling book, David Suzuki reflects on these changes and examines what they mean for our place in the world.

The basic message of this seminal, best-selling work remains the same: We are creatures of the earth, and as such, we are utterly dependent on its gifts of air, water, soil, and the energy of the sun. These elements are not just external factors; we take them into our bodies, where they are incorporated into our very essence. What replenishes the air, water, and soil and captures sunlight to vitalize the biosphere is the diverse web of all beings. The recently completed human genome project has revealed that all species are our biological kin, related to us through our evolutionary history. And it appears that our need for their company is programmed into our genome.

The cataclysmic events of the last decade require that we rethink our behaviour and find a new way to live in balance with our surroundings. This book offers just such a new direction for us all.
 

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An acclaimed geneticist artfully explains the diverse web of life, our kinship with other species, and the crucial need of our time to make Nature the ultimate concern of society at large and for our ... Read full review

Contents

Born of the Earth
19
2 The Breath of All Green Things
50
3 The Oceans Flowing Through Our Veins
81
4 Made From the Soil
114
5 The Divine Fire
156
6 Protected By Our Skin
183
7 The Law of Love
227
8 Sacred Matter
264
9 Restoring the Balance
293
Notes
331
Index
346
Credits
355
Acknowledgements
357
About the Authors
359
Back cover
360
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 114 - The LORD God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it.
Page 237 - No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy...
Page 24 - Sun is lost, and th'earth, and no mans wit Can well direct him where to looke for it. And freely men confesse that this world's spent, When in the Planets, and the Firmament They seeke so many new; then see that this Is crumbled out againe to his Atomies. 'Tis all in peeces, all cohaerence gone ; All just supply, and all Relation...
Page 46 - If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel's heart beat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence.
Page 81 - He sendeth the springs into the valleys, which run among the hills. They give drink to every beast of the field : the wild asses quench their thirst.
Page 24 - And new philosophy calls all in doubt, The element of fire is quite put out; The sun is lost, and th'earth, and no man's wit Can well direct him where to look for it.
Page 256 - The indescribable innocence and beneficence of Nature, — of sun and wind and rain, of summer and winter, — such health, such cheer, they afford forever! and such sympathy have they ever with our race, that all Nature would be affected, and the sun's brightness fade, and the winds would sigh humanely, and the clouds rain tears, and the woods shed their leaves and put on mourning in midsummer, if any man should ever for a just cause grieve.
Page 46 - A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.
Page 38 - Our enormously productive economy . . . demands that we make consumption our way of life, that we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfaction, our ego satisfaction, in consumption . . . We need things consumed, burned up, worn out, replaced and discarded at an ever increasing rate.

References to this book

Sacred Ecology
Fikret Berkes
No preview available - 2008
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About the author (2008)

DAVID SUZUKI is an acclaimed geneticist and environmentalist, the founder and chair of the David Suzuki Foundation, and the author of 42 books. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia. AMANDA MCCONNELL has written more than one hundred documentary films, many of them for The Nature of Things. She has a PhD in English Literature, and she writes and gardens in Toronto, Ontario. ADRIENNE MASON is the author of numerous books for adults and children. She is managing editor of the science magazine KNOW: The Science Magazine for Curious Kids and has been nominated four times for a Science in Society book award.

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