From Individual Behaviour to Population Ecology

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1996 - Science - 213 pages
Population dynamics and animal behaviour are two subjects that have developed almost independently, despite widespread acceptance of the idea that they must be related. The major objective of this book is to demonstrate how aspects of the population ecology of vertebrates, such as population size, migration systems, and the response of populations to ecological change, can be directly and realistically related to behaviour. Building on the strong theoretical foundation that now underpins behavioural ecology, the author suggests how to extrapolate from behavioural interactions to population-level phenomena, and explains the reasoning behind his approaches. Each chapter presents a combination of theory and empirical examples, and a chapter on modelling techniques is included. This book will be stimulating and useful to students and researchers in behaviour, population ecology, and conservation biology.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Summary
14
Dominance hierarchies
27
Prey populations
61
Territories
67
Mating systems and reproductive success
89
Population regulation
103
Migration
117
Applied problems
130
Predicting the consequences of habitat change
137
Predation and human disturbance
157
Modelling techniques
167
Author Index
203
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

William J. Sutherland is at University of East Anglia.

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