Metamorphoses

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2004 - Poetry - 597 pages
44 Reviews
Ovid's epic poem whose theme of change has resonated throughout the ages has become one of the most important texts of Western imagination, an inspiration from Dante's time to the present day, when writers such as Salman Rushdie and Italo Calvino have found a living source in Ovid's work. In this new, long-anticipated translation of Metamorphoses, Charles Martin combines a close fidelity to Ovid's text with verse that catches the speed and liveliness of the original. Portions of the translation have already appeared in such publications as Arion, The Formalist, The Tennessee Quarterly, and TriQuarterly.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MartinBodek - LibraryThing

#2 on the 1,001 Books to Read list. 999 to go. The takeaway was that I'm now properly prepared for the Jeopardy! category of Roman Gods, should I ever get on the show, and should that come up. Absent ... Read full review

Review: Metamorphoses

User Review  - Erika Schoeps - Goodreads

I write this review as a very ashamed Literature major... I just can't get through this. The main sentiments I interpreted from the text just seem to echo messages from Homer, and I thought that these ... Read full review

Contents

BOOK I
5
THE SHAPING OF CHANGES
13
OF MORTAL CHILDREN AND IMMORTAL LUSTS
49
BOOK IV
100
SPINNING YARNS AND WEAVING TALES
121
CONTESTS OF ARMS AND SONG
157
BOOK VIII
224
IMPIOUS ACTS AND EXEMPLARY LIVES
261
BOOK VI
352
ROME BEGINS AT TROY
367
BOOK XIII
408
SPOILS OF WAR AND PANGS OF LOVE
435
AROUND AND ABOUT WITH AENEAS
479
PROPHETIC ACTS AND VISIONARY DREAMS
519
Notes
555
Persons Places and Personifications in the Metamorphoses
577

DESIRE DECEIT AND DIFFICULT DELIVERIES
301
THE SONGS OF ORPHEUS
339

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About the author (2004)

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.

Charles Martin is a poet, critic, and translator. His translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses received the Harold Morton Landon Award from the Academy of American Poets in 2004. In 2005, he received an Award for Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is the author of Signs & Wonders and Starting from Sleep: New and Selected Poems.

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