Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Volume 42

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J.B. Lippincott Company, 1888
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Page 511 - No, the heart that has truly loved never forgets, But as truly loves on to the close ; As the sun-flower turns on her god, when he sets, The same look which she turned when he rose.
Page 728 - Till he learns the distinction 'twixt singing and preaching ; His lyre has some chords that would ring pretty well, But he'd rather by half make a drum of the shell, And rattle away till he's old as Methusalem, At the head of a march to the last New Jerusalem.
Page 731 - I doubt not that you will share with me an invincible confidence that niy writings (and among them these little poems) will co-operate with the benign tendencies in human nature and society, wherever found ; and that they will, in their degree, be efficacious in making men wiser, better, and happier.
Page 141 - I now see more good and more evil in all men than heretofore I did. I see that good men are not so good as I once thought they were, but have more imperfections ; and that nearer approach and fuller trial doth make the best appear more weak and faulty than their admirers at a distance think. And I find that few are so bad as either malicious enemies or censorious separating professors do imagine.
Page 525 - May we know what this new doctrine, whereof thou speakest, is? 20 For thou bringest certain strange things to our ears : we would know therefore what these things mean. 21 (For all the Athenians, and strangers which were there, spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing...
Page 504 - Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin ; yet I say unto you, that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.
Page 729 - I had. I am a good deal changed since those times ; and, to tell you the truth, my past self is not very much to my taste, as I see myself in this book.
Page 730 - Saul the son of Kish, who went out to seek his father's asses, and found a kingdom.
Page 728 - If not too refined, at all events too remote, too shadowy, and unsubstantial in his modes of development to suit the taste of the latter class, and yet too popular to satisfy the spiritual or metaphysical requisitions of the former, he must necessarily find himself without an audience, except here and there an individual or possibly an isolated clique.
Page 98 - tis not to come ; if it be not to come, it will be now ; if it be not now, yet it will come ; the readiness is all ; since no man has aught of what he leaves, what is't to leave betimes?

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