A Brief Account of the Countries Adjoining the Lake of Tiberias, the Jordan, and the Dead Sea

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Meyler and Son, 1810 - Palestine - 45 pages
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Page 52 - And he smote them from Aroer, even till thou come to Minnith, even twenty cities, and unto the plain of the vineyards, with a very great slaughter.
Page 45 - I was at Karrak, at the house of a Greek curate of the town, I saw a sort of cotton, resembling silk, which he used as tinder for his match-lock, as it could not be employed in making cloth. 'He told me that it grew in the plains of el-G6r, to the east of the Dead Sea, on a tree like the fig-tree, called aoeschaer.
Page 45 - It has struck me that these fruits, being, as they are: without pulp, and which are unknown throughout the rest of Palestine, might be the famous apples of Sodom. I suppose, likewise, that the tree which produces it, is a sort of fromager...
Page 52 - The umbella, somewhat like a bladder, containing from half a pint to a pint, is of the same color with the leaves, a bright green, and may be mistaken for an inviting fruit, without much stretch of imagination. That, as well as the other parts, when green, being cut or pressed, yields a milky juice, of a very acrid taste; but in winter, when dry, it contains a yellowish dust, in appearance resembling certain fungi common in South Britain, but of pungent quality, and said to be particularly injurious...
Page 16 - The copious source of the River of Banias rises near a remarkable grotto in the rock, on the declivity of which I copied some ancient Greek inscriptions, dedicated to Pan and the Nymphs of the Fountain. The ancients gave the name of ' Source of the Jordan' to the spring from which the Banias rises ; and its beauty might entitle it to that name. But, in fact, it appears, that the preference is due to the spring of the river Hasberia, which rises half a league to the W.
Page 52 - Seetzen is corroborated by a traveler, who passed a long time in situations where this plant is very abundant. The same idea occurred to him when he first saw it in 1792, though he did not then know that it existed near the lake Asphaltites. The umbella, somewhat like a bladder, containing from half a pint to a pint, is of the same color with the leaves, a bright green, and may be mistaken for an inviting fruit, without much stretch of imagination. That, as well...
Page 45 - While 1 was at Karrak, at the house of a Greek curate of the town, I saw a sort of cotton, resembling silk, which he used as tinder for his match-lock, as it could not be employed in making cloth. He told me that it grew in the plains of...
Page 25 - ... habitations near Draa, the ancient Edrei, Josh. xiii. 31, illustrates the passage : as there can be no doubt, that similar habitations are referred to by the prophet. " The district of El Botthin contains many thousand caverns made in rocks by the ancient inhabitants of the country. Most of the houses, even in these villages, which are yet inhabited, are a kind of grotto, composed of walls placed against the projecting points of the rocks, in such a manner, that the walls of the inner chamber,...
Page 26 - ... labor, since they are formed in the hard rock. There is only one door of entrance, which is so regularly fitted into the rock, that it shuts like the door of a house. It appears then that this country was formerly inhabited by Troglodytes. . . . There are still to be found many families living in caverns, sufficiently spacious to contain them, and all their cattle. These immense caverns are moreover to be found in considerable numbers, in the district of Al-Jedur some leagues to the southward...
Page 34 - Ruins are seen in every direction. The country is divided between the Turks and the Arabs, but chiefly possessed by the latter. The extortions of the one, and the depredations of the other, keep it in perpetual desolation and make it a spoil to the heathen. " The far greater part of the country is...

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