Fabianism and Culture: A Study in British Socialism and the Arts C1884-1918

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 20, 2005 - History - 344 pages
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This book is an attempt to remedy the neglect of the cultural and aesthetic aspects of English socialism in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. An outstanding symptom of this neglect is the way in which the Fabian Society, and its two leading lights, Sidney and Beatrice Webb, have usually been depicted as completely indifferent to art and to the artistic ramifications of socialism. Most commentators have painted Fabian socialism as a narrowly utilitarian programme of social and administrative reform, preoccupied with the mechanisms of politics and largely obvious of wider, more 'human' issues. One of the basic aims of the book is to question this bleakly philistine image, by showing the basis of the Fabians' beliefs in romancism as well as utilitarianism.
 

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Contents

Thomas Davidson the New Life Fellowship and the earliest
25
towards a socialist partnership
53
Three Fabian essayists and William Morris
71
Bernard Shaw
96
the practice of renunciation
113
The Fabians as antiascetics
143
artistic activities of the Fabian Society
163
Fabian lecturing on the arts and
192
Fabian attitudes to workingclass culture
223
Fabians art and democracy
253
Conclusion
271
Bibliography
310
Index
325
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