True Visions: The Emergence of Ambient Intelligence

Front Cover
Emile H.L. Aarts, José Luis Encarnação
Springer, Dec 13, 2006 - Science - 437 pages

Ambient intelligence (AI) refers to a developing technology that will increasingly make our everyday environment sensitive and responsive to our presence. The AI vision requires technology invisibly embedded in our everyday surroundings, present whenever we need it that will lead to the seamless integration of lighting, sounds, vision, domestic appliances, and personal healthcare products to enhance our living experience. Written for the non-specialist seeking an authoritative but accessible overview of this interdisciplinary field, True Visions explains how the devices making up the AI world will operate collectively using information and intelligence hidden in the wireless network connecting them. Expert contributions address key AI components such as smart materials and textiles, system architecture, mobile computing, broadband communication, and underlying issues of human-environment interactions. It seeks to unify the perspectives of scientists from diverse backgrounds ranging from the physics of materials to the aesthetics of industrial design as it describes the emergence of ambient intelligence, one of today’s most compelling areas of innovation.

 

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Contents

Into Ambient Intelligence E Aarts and J Encarnagao
1
12 Trends and Opportunities
2
121 More Moore and More than Moore
3
123 The Experience Economy
4
124 Advances in Design
5
13 A Brief History of Ambient Intelligence
6
132 Opening up the Vision
7
133 Where Are We Headed?
8
1123 Web Service Grids
213
1124 The Data Deluge as a Driver for eScience
214
113 Pervasive Computing and Ambient Intelligence
216
1131 Sensor Networks
217
1132 Interaction
218
114 The Semantic Web
219
1141 Towards a Semantic Grid
220
1142 Semantic Web and Pervasive Computing
221

14 Realizing Ambient Intelligence
10
142 Reorientation
11
143 Impact Through Integration
13
144 Turning Vision into Reality
14
15 Ambient Intelligence Becomes a Success
16
Information Society and Technology Close Encounters of a Different Kind JC Burgelman and Y Punie
18
A Different Encounter Between Technology and Society
20
222 Shifts in EU RTD Framework Programmes
21
223 Designing Ambient Intelligence is Designing Social Structures
22
23 IST the European Social Model and the Lisbon Objectives
24
24 Foresight in IST in Europe
26
242 Promising IST Applications
27
25 Ami Innovation in Europe
28
251 AmI and eLearning
29
252 AmI and eHealth
30
253 AmI and eGovernment
31
254 AmI and eIdentification
32
26 Conclusions
34
Ambient Culture S Marzano
36
33 What Should Ambient Intelligence Do?
37
332 Social and Physical Constraints
39
333 Potential for Growth Profit and Wealth
40
341 Relevant Meaningful Understandable
41
35 Some Examples
42
352 New Nomads
43
353 Living Memory
44
36 How Do We Create the Right Ambient Intelligence the Relevant Hypothesis for a Desirable Future?
45
361 Imagineering
46
362 Communication
47
364 Into Production
48
372 Bottom of the Pyramid
49
38 Deeper Issues
50
382 The Next Challenge
51
384 Which Reality Is Real?
52
39 How to Measure Intelligence?
53
Smart Materials DJ Broer H van Houten M Ouwerkerk JMJ den Toonder P van der Sluis SI Klink RAM Hikmet and R Balkenende
54
42 Chromogenic Materials
55
43 Thermochromic Skins Based on Liquid Crystals
57
44 Switchable Mirrors
59
45 Switchable Cholesteric Mirrors
62
46 Electronic Skins and Paintable Displays
64
47 Polymers with a Mechanical Response
67
471 Electrically Stimulated Responsive Polymers
69
472 TemperatureDriven Responsive Polymers
77
473 LightDriven Polymer Smart Materials
80
474 Other Stimuli
82
Electronic Dust and eGrains H Reichl and M J Wolf
84
52 Basic Construction of SelfSufficient Wireless Sensor Nodes eGrains
86
53 System Design
88
54 System Integration Technologies
90
541 Stacking of Organic Substrates
91
542 Integration of Flexible Functional Layers
94
55 Embedded Components in Organic Substrates
102
56 WaferLevel Integration by Chip or Wafer Stacking
103
57 Autonomous Energy Supply for eGrains
106
58 WaferLevel Integration of LithiumPolymer Batteries
107
59 Microfuel Cell Integration
108
510 Summary and Outlook
111
Electronic Textiles H Reichl C Kallmayer and T Linz Electronic means that textiles are capable of exchanging information
114
62 Conductors
116
623 Intrinsically Conductive Yarn
117
63 Textile Processing with Conductive Threads
118
632 Embroidery
119
64 Interconnection and Packaging
120
642 Detachable Interconnections
121
643 Dimensions and Precision
122
65 Applications
123
652 Communication Jacket
125
653 Textile Transponder
126
66 Future Challenges
128
67 Conclusion and Outlook
130
Computing Platforms H De Man and R Lauwereins
132
Managing Gigacomplexity
133
721 Managing the Architectural Gap
134
Nanoscale Realities Hit Platform Architects
137
Towards Highly Parallel Tilebased NetworkonaChip NoC
140
724 The Devil Is in the Software
144
Ultracreativity for Ultralow Power and Cost
145
74 Conclusions
147
Software Platforms N Georgantas P Inverardi and V Issarny
150
82 Software Systems for Ambient Intelligence
151
821 Software Architectures
152
822 Middleware
153
823 Architectural Framework for Software Systems
154
User TaskDriven Environment Configuration
156
832 Triggers to Dynamic Behavior
157
833 Dynamic Behavior
158
Programmable Active Spaces
159
842 Triggers to Dynamic Behavior
161
843 Dynamic Behavior
162
Ad hoc Decentralized Ami Environments
163
852 Triggers to Dynamic Behavior
165
853 Dynamic Behavior
166
86 Assessment and Research Challenges
167
Mobile Computing B Svendsen
170
92 Applications of Mobile Computing
171
922 Electronic Tags Replace Bar Codes and Add More to It
172
924 Attentive Vehicles Road and Transport Safety
173
925 Public Services for Citizens
174
93 In the Bottom Lies the Technology
175
932 Wireless Location
176
933 Multistandard and Flexible Software Radio
177
935 Wireless Concepts and Technologies for Novel Applications
179
94 Challenges Imposed on the Domain by Ambient Intelligence
180
95 How Far Have We Come?
181
953 Electronic Luggage Tags at Airports
182
955 Electronic Shepherds and Surveillance
183
956 Mobile Phone as Tourist Guide
184
96 Concluding Remarks
185
Broadband Communication P Lagasse and I Moerman
186
102 Ongoing Evolutions in Broadband Communication
187
103 Too Many Wireless Technologies Today?
188
1032 Do We Really Need All Those Technologies?
191
104 How to Deal with All These Wireless Technologies?
193
1042 Main Challenges of Personal Networks
197
1043 Some Personal Network Solutions
200
105 Conclusions
205
eInfrastructure and eScience T Hey D De Roure and AE Trefethen
210
112 eScience and the Grid
211
1122 The eScience Infrastructure
212
115 The Symbiosis of Grid and Ambient Intelligent Computing
222
1153 The Grid Needs Devices to Interface with the Physical World
223
1156 Grid Computation on Networks of Devices
224
1161 CombeChem
225
1162 Grid Based Medical Devices for Everyday Health
226
1163 FloodNet
227
117 Challenges to the Vision
228
118 Conclusions
229
Context Aware Services JL Crowley P Reignier and J Coutaz
232
122 A Brief History of Context
233
1222 Context in Computer Vision
234
123 A Conceptual Framework for Context Aware Systems
235
1231 A Layered Model for Context Aware Services
236
124 Defining Situation Models as Interaction Scripts
237
Keep It Simple
238
Context Aware Automatic Video Acquisition
239
Adaptation and Development
243
127 Conclusions
245
Computational Intelligence E Aarts H ter Horst J Korst and W Verhaegh
246
132 Machine Intelligence
247
1322 Movie Script Scenarios for Ambient Intelligence
248
1323 Social Versus Cognitive Intelligence
250
133 Ami Elements of Social Intelligence
251
1331 See Hear Feel
252
1332 Understand Interpret Relate
253
1333 Look Find Remember
254
1334 Act Adapt Learn
256
1335 Create Express Emerge
257
134 Computational Paradigms
258
1342 Reasoning
262
1343 Learning
266
1344 Evolution
269
135 Intrinsic Limitations
272
136 Concluding Challenges
273
Social User Interfaces A Nijholt D Heylen B de Ruyter and P Saini
276
142 Social Interfaces and Multimodal Interaction
278
the iCat Case
281
1431 Experiment
282
1432 Tasks
284
1434 Results
285
144 Modeling Affect in a Dialogical Robot
286
1442 Affective Interactions
288
145 Conclusions and Future Research
291
Multimodal HumanEnvironment Interaction R Wasinger and W Wahlster
292
152 Tangible Multimodal Dialog Scenario
293
153 Instrumented Environment Infrastructure
295
154 Symmetric Multimodal Interaction
297
1541 Base Modalities
298
1542 Symmetric Modality Combinations
299
1543 Output Modality Allocation Strategy
300
155 Anthropomorphized Products
301
1552 Adding Humanlike Characteristics
302
1553 StateBased Object Model
303
156 Usability Study
304
1562 Results
305
1563 Lessons Learnt
306
Intelligent Media P Treleaven and S Emmott
308
162 Emergence of Intelligent Media
309
163 Economic Importance of the Creative Industries
310
1641 Key Concepts
311
1642 Key Technologies
312
165 Intelligent Media and the Creative Sectors
313
1651 Film and Television
314
1653 Cultural Sectors
316
1654 Design
317
1656 Advertising
318
166 Conclusion
320
Smart Environments T Kirste
322
172 Smart Environments
323
the Ensemble Challenge
326
1732 and Its Implications
327
1733 Significant Changes
328
174 The Source of Strategy
330
175 GoalBased Interaction
331
176 Appliances and Event Processing Pipelines
334
1762 Towards a Middleware for SelfOrganizing Ensembles
335
1763 Ensemble Organization by SodaPop
337
177 Conclusion
339
Sensory Augmented Computing B Schiele
340
182 Sensing Opportunities for Ambient Intelligence
341
Placement of Sensors
342
1824 Discussion
344
184 Sensing a Furniture Assembly
345
1842 Assembly Plan
346
1843 Observing the Users Actions
348
1844 Sensor Experiments
349
1845 Detecting Partial Actions
350
1846 Detecting Complete Actions
351
185 SituationAware Affordances
352
1852 Specific Solution
353
1853 Summary of a User Study
355
186 Conclusions and Discussion
356
Experience Design B Eggen and S Kyffin
360
192 Looking to the Future
361
1922 The Future Seen from a Peoples Point of View
364
193 The Home Experience
365
194 Design Insights of Ami Systems
366
195 New Directions
371
1952 Interaction with Intelligent Tangible Objects
373
1953 Ambient Culture
374
1954 UserCentered Design
375
196 Conclusion
377
Experience Research ET Hvannberg
378
202 Goals of Experience Research
380
203 EARC Life Cycle Model
381
2031 Exploration of the Problem Situation
382
2032 Feasibility and Quality of Interaction
383
2033 Demonstration and Validation
384
2034 Assisted Reality
385
204 Facilitators of Experience Research
386
2042 Experiments
388
2043 Experience and Knowledge Management
389
205 Example Developments in Experience Research
390
2053 Telenors House of the Future
391
2056 Innovation Lab Katrinebjerg
392
206 Challenges
393
References
394
Index
434
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About the author (2006)

Emile Aarts is Vice-President and Scientific Program Director of the Philips Research Laboratories. Eindhoven, and a Professor of Computer Science at Eindhoven University of Technology.

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