Watching the World Change: The Stories Behind the Images of 9/11

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Macmillan, Aug 2, 2011 - History - 480 pages
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The attack on the World Trade Center was the most watched event in human history. And the footage recorded that day came from myriad perspectives—from TV cameras and tourist snapshots to photographer Thomas E. Franklin's iconic image of three firefighters raising the American flag at Ground Zero. David Friend explains how that week marked a phase change in the digital age, a moment when all the advances in television, photography, and the Web converged on a single event. A brilliant chronicle of how we process disaster, Watching the World Change is "an elegant and moving examination of the photographic legacy of that day in history....Brings meaning to a terrible time" (New Orleans Times-Picayune).

Includes the exclusive story of the French filmmaker brothers who chronicled the attacks and survived the collapse of the towers.

 

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Watching the world change: the stories behind the images of 9/11

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Friend (creative development editor,Vanity Fair ) uses his background in photography and visual analysis to explore over 40 photographs documenting the horrific events of 9/11 in New York City. He ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CapeCodMichelle - LibraryThing

We all saw the horrific pictures. This gives more depth to them. Read full review

Contents

1 Tuesday September 11
3
2 Wednesday September 12
51
3 Thursday September 13
106
4 Friday September 14
164
5 Saturday September 15
206
6 Sunday September 16
257
7 Monday September 17
308
Notes
349
Acknowledgments
415
Index
419
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About the author (2011)

David Friend, Vanity Fair's editor of creative development, was the directory of photography for Life magazine. He won an Emmy (with Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter) for the documentary 9/11, about two French documentary makers drawn into the disaster. He lives in New Rochelle, New York.

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