Of the Origin and Progress of Language, Volume 3

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J. Balfour, 1786 - Language and languages
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Page 147 - Or dreams he sees, while overhead the moon Sits arbitress, and nearer to the earth Wheels her pale course ; they, on their mirth and dance Intent, with jocund music charm his ear; At once with joy and fear his heart rebounds.
Page 101 - Thus saying, from her husband's hand her hand Soft she withdrew ; and like a wood-nymph light, Oread or Dryad, or of Delia's train, Betook her to the groves, but Delia's self In gait...
Page 75 - I give not heaven for lost. From this descent Celestial virtues rising, will appear More glorious and more dread than from no fall, And trust themselves to fear no second fate.
Page 147 - Turn'd fiery red, sharpening in mooned horns Their phalanx, and began to hem him round With ported spears, as thick as when a field Of Ceres ripe for harvest waving bends Her bearded grove of ears, which way the wind Sways them ; the careful plowman doubting stands^ Lest on the threshing floor his hopeful sheaves Prove chaff.
Page 21 - Paved after him a broad and beaten way Over the dark Abyss, whose boiling gulf Tamely endured a bridge of wondrous length, From Hell continued, reaching...
Page 79 - ... he fhould be mentioned among the other commanders ; in order to give him fome kind of heroic dignity, and, at the fame time, to adorn his verfe, he has named him thrice in three verfes, and in the fame place, viz. at the head of each verfe *, which makes the figure aflume the name of S7ravu(po(>a. in Greek "f. This is a common figure in all languages, and in all kinds of compofition.
Page 108 - T?i either of thefe, give a turn and form to the thought and expreffion, different from what is ufual in common fpeech. Under one or other of thefe heads may be ranked, as I imagine, every figure of this kind that can be devifed. By the firft kind of thefe, the ftyle Is made...
Page 368 - ... imitate the fimplicity of Dean Swift's ftyle in his Gulliver's Travels, and to endeavour to give as much the appearance of credibility to what truth they relate as he has given to his monftrous fictions ; not that I would be underftood to recommend the ftyle of thofe travels as a pattern for hiftory, for which it never was intended, being indeed an excellent imitation of the narrative of a failor, but wanting that gravity, dignity, and ornament which the hiftorical ftyle requires. For the fubject...
Page 347 - I'ma perfect slave. What d'ye think is my place in this family ? Arch. Butler, I suppose. Scrub. Ah, Lord help you! I'll tell you. Of a Monday I drive the coach, of a Tuesday I drive the plough, on Wednesday I follow the hounds, a Thursday I dun the tenants, on Friday I go to market, on Saturday I draw warrants, and a Sunday I draw beer.
Page 147 - While thus he spake, the angelic squadron bright Turn'd fiery red, sharpening in mooned horns Their phalanx, and began to hem him round With ported spears...

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