Satan: A Poem

Front Cover
Samuel Maunder, 1830 - Devil - 391 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

I
19
II
109
III
229

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 217 - And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.
Page 214 - To the first question I should answer : Christianity is not a theory, or a speculation ; but a life;— not a philosophy of life, but a life and a living process. To the second : TRY IT. It has been eighteen hundred years in existence : and has one individual left a record, like the following? " I tried it ; and it did not answer. I made the experiment faithfully according to the directions ; and the result has been, a conviction of my own credulity.
Page 104 - We close our view of Bonaparte's character by saying that his original propensities, released from restraint, and pampered by indulgence, to a degree seldom allowed to mortals, grew up into a spirit of despotism as stern and absolute as ever usurped the human heart. The love of power and supremacy absorbed, consumed him. No other passion, no domestic attachment, no private friendship, no love of pleasure, no relish for letters or the arts, no human sympathy, no human weakness, divided his mind with...
Page 206 - Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices, to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
Page 104 - Now, upon SYRIA'S land of roses Softly the light of eve reposes, And, like a glory, the broad sun Hangs over sainted LEBANON ; Whose head in wintry grandeur towers, And whitens with eternal sleet, While summer, in a vale of flowers, Is sleeping rosy at his feet.
Page 388 - I have been just taking a walk in St. James's Park, full of the reflections of the transitory nature of all human delights, and giving my thoughts a loose into the contemplation of those sensations of satisfaction which probably we may taste in the more exalted company of separate spirits, when we range the starry walks above and gaze on the world at a vast distance, as now we do on those.
Page 210 - The fall of angels therefore was pride. Since their fall, their practices have been the clean contrary unto those before mentioned. For being dispersed, some in the air, some on the earth, some in the water, some among the minerals, dens, and caves that are under the earth, they have by all means laboured to effect an universal rebellion against the laws, and, as far as in them lieth, utter destruction of the works of God.
Page 104 - Before this. dutv. honor, love, humanity, fell prostrate. Josephine we are told was dear to him ; but the devoted wife, who had stood firm and faithful in the day of his doubtful fortunes, was cast off in his prosperity, to make room for a stranger, who might be more subservient to his power. He was affectionate, we are told, to his brothers and mother ; but his brothers, the moment they ceased to be his tools, were disgraced : and his mother, it is said, was not allowed to sit in the presence of...
Page 215 - ... met with some one, in whom on any other point you would place unqualified trust, who has on his own experience made report to you, that " he is faithful who promised, and what he promised he has proved himself able to perform :" is it bigotry, if I fear that the Unbelief, which prejudges and prevents the experiment, has its source elsewhere than in the uncorrupted judgment; that not the strong free Mind, but the enslaved Will, is the true original Infidel in this instance...
Page 32 - IB coming when you moulder into dust, And melt away, like dew upon the wind ! So sink the monuments of ancient might, So fade the gauds and splendours of the world, Her empires brighten, blaze, and pass away, And trophied fanes, and adamantine domes, That threaten'd an eternity, depart. Amid the dying change, or lapse of things, Enthroned o'er all, a desolation frowns, Save mind, — omnipotent, surpassing mind ! One scintillation of a soul inspired, Though kindled in an atmosphere of gloom Or loneliness,...

Bibliographic information