Familiar Quotations: Being an Attempt to Trace to Their Source Passages and Phrases in Common Use

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Little, Brown, 1868 - Quotations - 778 pages
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Page 94 - a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand ? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling, as to sight ? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain
Page 538 - Ring out old shapes of foul disease, Ring out the narrowing lust of gold Ring out the thousand wars of old, Ring in the thousand years of peace. Ring in the valiant man and free, The eager heart, the kindlier hand ; Ring out the darkness of the land, Ring in the Christ that is to be.
Page 48 - TWELFTH NIGHT. If music be the food of love, play on ; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. That strain again ; it had a dying fall : O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour. Act
Page 99 - Act iv. Sc. 3. Give sorrow words ; the grief that does not speak Whispers the o'er-fraught heart, and bids it break. Act iv. Sc. 3. What, all my pretty chickens, and their dam, At one fell swoop ? Act iv. Sc. 3. I cannot but remember such things were, That were most precious to me. Act iv.
Page 106 - entrance to a quarrel ; but, being in, Bear 't that the opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy ; rich, not gaudy : For the apparel oft proclaims the man.
Page 163 - Prison, ii. Fishes, that tipple in the deep, Know no such liberty. ibid. Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage ; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage ; If I have freedom in my love, And in my soul am free, Angels alone that soar above Enjoy such liberty. Ibid.
Page 99 - Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud, but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not. Act v.
Page 289 - Part ii. Line 126. In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold, Alike fantastic if too new or old : Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. Part ii. Line 133. Some to church repair, Not for the doctrine, but the music there.
Page 475 - Thus heavenly hope is all serene, But earthly hope, how bright soe'er, Still fluctuates o'er this changing scene, As false and fleeting as 't is fair. On Heavenly Hope and Earthly Hope. From Greenland's icy mountains, From India's coral strand, Where Afric's sunny fountains Roll down their golden sand. Missionary Hymn.
Page 54 - O, who can hold a fire in his hand By thinking on the frosty Caucasus ? Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite By bare imagination of a feast ? Or wallow naked in December snow, By thinking on fantastic Summer's heat. O, no ! the apprehension of the good Gives but the greater feeling to the worse. Act

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