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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on We found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of all guile and treason,....
" We found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of all guile and treason, and such as live after the manner of the golden age. "
Scribner's Magazine - Page 319
by Edward Livermore Burlingame - 1907
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Historical account of discoveries and travels in North America: including ...

Hugh Murray - Arctic regions - 1829
...say, " the soil is the most plentiful, sweet, fruitful, and wholesome of all the world. We found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of all guile and treason, and such as lived after the manner of the golden age." These reports enchanted Raleigh, and filled the whole kingdom...
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Traditions of the North American Indians: Being a Second and ..., Volume 2

James Athearn Jones - Folklore - 1830
...is said that they were entertained with as much bounty as could possibly be devised. They found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of...such as live after the manner of the golden age.— See Hakluyt. In the first sermon ever preached in New England, the preacher says of the Indians : "...
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Advice in the Pursuits of Literature: Containing Historical, Biographical ...

Samuel Lorenzo Knapp - Books and reading - 1832 - 296 pages
...luxurious, and their bounty as without stint. To use the precise language of their report, " we found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of...such as live after the manner of the golden age." Their manner of serving up their food was quite different to the Indians of more northern climes. •....
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Advice in the pursuits of literature: containing historical, biographical ...

Samuel Lorenzo Knapp - Books and reading - 1832 - 296 pages
...luxurious, and their bounty as without stint. To use the precise language of their report, "we found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of...such as live after the manner of the golden age." Their manner of serving up their food was quite different to the Indians of more northern climes. This...
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A history of the United States

George Bancroft - 1834
...Granganimeo, father of Wingina, the king, with the refinements of Arcadian hospitality. " The people were most gentle, loving and faithful, void of all guile and treason, and such as lived after the manner of the golden age." They had no cares but to guard against the moderate cold...
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A History of hte United States, from the Discovery of America to the ...

George Bancroft - 1834
...Granganimeo, father of Wingina, the king, with the refinements of Arcadian hospitality. " The people were most gentle, loving and faithful, void of all guile and treason, and such as lived after the manner of the golden age." They had no cares but to guard against the moderate cold...
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Lives of the Presidents of the United States: With Biographical Notices of ...

Robert W. Lincoln - Presidents - 1836 - 508 pages
...maner, as they could possibly devise. We found the people most gentle, loving, and faithful!, voide of all guile and treason, and such as live after the manner of the golden age. The people onley care howe to defend themselves from the cold in their short winter, and to feed themselves...
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On the Classical Tongues and the Advantages of Their Study: An Inaugural ...

Isaac William Stuart - Classical education - 1836 - 23 pages
...rightful Queene and Princesse thereof." Here, in the words of the historian Ilakluyte, they found '• a people most gentle, loving and faithful, void of all guile and treason, and lived after the manner of the golden age." Then and here was the birth-place of this now mighty empire....
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British colonization and coloured tribes

Saxe Bannister - Indigenous peoples - 1838 - 323 pages
...whole, they could not fail to lead to violences and injure the Indians, although at the outset described as " a people most gentle, loving, and faithful, void of all guile and treason, and such as lived after the manner of the golden age." The colonists were many, their wives few; convicts, and...
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Tales and Ballads

Caroline Howard Gilman - 1884 - 190 pages
...those of England, that the fruits, vegetables, fish and game were abundant, and that the people were " most gentle, loving and faithful, void of all guile and treason," and that they lived "after the manner of the golden age." Such reports, so verified, excited enthusiasm...
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