The Archaeology of Africa: Food, Metals and Towns

Front Cover
Bassey Andah, Alex Okpoko, Thurstan Shaw, Paul Sinclair
Routledge, May 22, 2014 - Social Science - 896 pages
Africa has a vibrant past. It emerges from this book as the proud possessor of a vast and highly complicated interweaving of peoples and cultures, practising an enormous diversity of economic and social strategies in an 2xtraordinary range of environmental situations.
At long last the archaeology of Africa has revealed enough of Africa's unwritten past to confound preconceptions about this continent and to upset the picture inferred from historic written records. Without an understanding of its past complexities, it is impossible to grasp Africa's present, let alone its future.
 

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Contents

Infrared spectroscopy
the transition from hunting
The transition to farming in Egypt
Pleistocene postpleistocene adaptations and Wadi Kubbaniya
The emergence ofa foodproducing economy in the Sahara
Identifying early farming traditions of west Africa
a case study of early sedentism and food
a view from central Ghana

34
39
foodproduction
18
40
35
The climatic and vegetational history of the equatorial regions
The tropicalAfrican cereals J R Harlan Sorghum
24
5
Thintailed woolsheep Fattailed sheep Fatrumped sheep Goats
25
NiloSaharans and the SaharoSudanese Neolithic
Locating early NiloSaharan societies Reconstructing domestic economy in the early NiloSaharan eras The onset of food production
27
Recent developments in African language classification and their
Conclusion
Linguistic evidencefor the use of some tree and tuber food plants
Examination of botanical remains from early neolithic houses
some
Cultivated plants
Settlementstudy Some observedregularities in spatial arrangement
21
23
Transition from Late Stone Age to Iron Age in the SudanoSahelian
The archaeological
some of
Ancient ironworkingin Madagascar
Acknowledgements The ironusing communities in Kenya
31
The magicalproduction of ironinthe Cameroon Grassfields M Rowlands J P Warnier
S K McIntosh R J McIntosh Identifying urbanismin the archaeological record
a case study
The regionalsurvey Regional trade andurban effects
Begho
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
Africas climate in theHolocene A T Grove Introduction The end ofthe Pleistocenein Africa

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