Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-worshippers, and Other Pagans in America

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Penguin Books, 2006 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 646 pages
17 Reviews
The only detailed history of a little-known and widely misunderstood movement, Drawing Down the Moon provides a fascinating look at the religious experiences, beliefs, and lifestyles of the Neo-Pagan subculture. Margot Adler attended ritual gatherings and interviewed a diverse, colourful gallery of people across the United States, people who find inspiration in ancient deities, nature, myth, even science fiction. Contrary to stereotype, what Adler discovered was neither cults nor odd sects, but religious groups that are nonauthoritarian in spirit and share the belief that there is no one path to divinity.

This edition of Drawing Down the Moon includes a completely updated and expanded resource guide that details several hundred related journals, festivals, newsletters and groups.

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As complete as it could have been in 1979

User Review  - peacockjp - Overstock.com

Without revealing secret and unspoken truths of the craft Margo has written a book that is not only very informational it is also completely captivating. It seems strange for me to use the word ... Read full review

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User Review  - lilwatchergirl - LibraryThing

I wish I could have liked this, but in the end there was too much Robert Graves-influenced talk of a mythical 'old religion' for me. And in the end just not relevant to me. Some useful ideas here if witchcraft appeals to you. I'm more the druidic type! Read full review

Contents

A Religion Without Converts
13
The Pagan World View
22
Witches
33
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Margot Adler has been a radio producer and journalist since 1968, pioneering live, free-form talk shows on religion, politics, women's issues, and ecology. She lectures on the subject of Paganism and Earth-centered traditions and leads workshops on the art of ritual, celebration, and song. She is currently the New York Bureau Chief for National Public Radio as well as a well-known correspondent on NPR's All Things Considered. Her most recent book is Heretic's Heart: A Journey Through Spirit and Revolution.

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