Bulwer's Plays: Being the Complete Dramatic Works of Lord Lytton (Sir Edward Lytton Bulwer, Bart.) ... From the Original Text

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R. M. De Witt, 1875 - 396 pages
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Page 33 - The pen is mightier than the sword. Behold The arch-enchanter's wand ! itself a nothing ! But taking sorcery from the master-hand To paralyze the Caesars, and to strike The loud earth breathless ! Take away the sword ; States can be, saved without it ! (Looking on the clock.) 'Tis the hour ; Retire, sir.
Page 28 - Sharp, it exists in the breeches' pocket ! Observe : I lay this piece of yellow earth on the table — I contemplate you both ;• — the man there — the gold here ! Now, there is many a man in those streets honest as you are, who moves, thinks, feels, and reasons as well as we do ; excellent in form — imperishable in soul ; who, if his pockets were three days empty, would sell thought, reason, body, and soul too, for that little coin ! Is that the fault of the man ? — no ! it is the...
Page 39 - And you would have a wife enjoy luxury while a husband toils! Claude, take me; thou canst not give me wealth, titles, station — but thou canst give me a true heart. I will work for thee, tend thee, bear with thee, and never, never shall these lips reproach thee for the past.
Page 33 - Were made a living thing, and wore thy shape ! I saw thee, and the passionate heart of man Enter'd the breast of the wild-dreaming boy. And from that hour I grew — what to the last I shall be — thine adorer! Well, this love Vain, frantic, guilty, if thou wilt, became A fountain of ambition and bright hope ; I thought of tales that by the winter hearth Old gossips tell...
Page 28 - Battledore! — that is a contest between two parties: both parties knock about something with singular skill — something is kept up — high — low — here — there — everywhere — nowhere! How grave are the players! how anxious the bystanders! how noisy the battledores! But when this something falls to the ground, only fancy — it's nothing but cork and feather! Go, and play by yourselves — I'm no hand at it! Stout [aside]. Sad ignorance! — Aristocrat! Gloss. Heartless principles!...
Page 26 - We'd have no friends That were not lovers; no ambition, save To excel them all in love; we'd read no books That were not tales of love — that we might smile To think how poorly eloquence of words Translates the poetry of hearts like ours! And when night came, amidst the breathless Heavens...
Page 26 - — Why, this, forgive me, Is what — when done with a less dainty grace — Plain folks call "theft!
Page 26 - — Why this, forgive me, Is what — when done with a less dainty grace — Plain folks call " Theft !" You owe eight thousand pistoles, Minus one crown, two liards ! De Mau.
Page 34 - No, not slave! Despair is free! I will not tell thee of the throes — the struggles The anguish — the remorse: No, let it pass! And let me come to such most poor atonement Yet in my power. Pauline!
Page 28 - ... many a man in those streets honest as you are, who moves, thinks, feels, and reasons as well as we do; excellent in form — imperishable in soul ; who, if his pockets were three days empty, would sell thought, reason, body, and soul too, for that little coin ! Is that the fault of the man ? — no ! it is the fault of mankind ! God made man ; behold what mankind have made a god ! When I was poor, I hated the world ; now I am rich, I despise it ! Fools — knaves — hypocrites ! By the bye,...

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