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Hurd and Houghton., 1870
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Page 63 - And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down and worshipped him; and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts, gold and frankincense and myrrh.
Page 89 - Heap on more wood ! — the wind is chill, But let it whistle as it will, We'll keep our Christmas merry still.
Page 46 - Knowing thou needest this form, as I thy divine inspiration, Knowing thou shapest the clay with a vision and purpose divine, So would I answer each touch of thy hand in its loving creation, That in my conscious life thy power and beauty may shine. Reflecting the noble intent thou hast in forming thy creatures; Waking from sense into life of the soul, and the image of thee; Working with thee in thy work to model humanity's features Into the likeness of God, myself from myself I would free. One with...
Page 105 - Criticisms, Tales, Sketches of Travel and Discovery, Poetry, Scientific, Biographical, Historical, and Political Information, from the entire body of Foreign Periodical Literature, and from the pens of The ablest and most cultivated intellects, in every department of Literature.
Page 46 - Waking from sense into life of the soul, and the image of thee; Working with thee in thy work to model humanity's features Into the likeness of God, myself from myself I would free. " One with all human existence, no one above or below me ; Lit by thy wisdom and love, as roses are steeped in the morn ; Growing from clay to a statue, from statue to flesh, till thou know me Wrought into manhood celestial, and in thine image re-born. So in thy love will I trust, bringing me sooner or later Past the...
Page 66 - And Simeon blessed them, and said unto Mary His mother, Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising again of many in Israel; and for a sign which shall be spoken against; (yea, a sword shall pierce through thy own soul also,) that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.
Page 70 - For though the land she dwells in is most fair, Set round with streams, like picture in its frame, Yet often in her heart deep longings are For that imperial palace whence she came.
Page 70 - She walks erect through dangers manifold, While many sink and fail on either hand. She dreads not summer's heat nor winter's cold, For both are subject to the king's command; She need not be afraid of anything,' Because she is a daughter of the king. Even when the angel comes that men call Death, And name with terror, it appalls not her; She turns to look at him, with quickened breath, Thinking,
Page 105 - COMPENDIUM of all that is admirable and noteworthy in the literary w,.rld will be spared the trouble of wading through the sea of reviews and magazines published abroad : for they will find the essence of all compacted and concentrated here.
Page 105 - It has more real solid worth, more useful Information, than any similar publication we know of. The ablest essays, the most entertaining stories, the finest poetry of the English language, are here gathered together.

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