Between Chora and the Good: Metaphor's Metaphysical Neighborhood

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Fordham Univ Press, 2005 - Philosophy - 495 pages
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Plato's chora as developed in the Timaeus is a creative matrix in which things arise and stand out in response
to the lure of the Good. Chora is paired with the Good, its polar opposite; both are "beyond being" and the metaphors hitherto thought to disclose the transcendent. They underlie Plato's distinction of a procreative gap between being and becoming. The chiasmus between the Good and chora makes possible their mutual participation in one another. This gap makes possible both phenomenological and cosmological interpretations of Plato.

Metaphor is restricted to beings as they appear in this gap through the crossing of metaphor's terms, terms that dwell with, rather than subulate, one another. Hermeneutically, through its "is" we can see something being engendered or determined by that crossing.

Bigger's larger goal is to align the primacy of the Good in Plato and Christian Neoplatonism with the creator God
of Genesis and the God of love in the New Testament.

 

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Contents

VIII
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IX
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XIII
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XV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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Page 23 - For all that may be known of God by men lies plain before their eyes; indeed God himself has disclosed it to them. His invisible attributes, that is to say his everlasting power and deity, have been visible, ever since the world began to the eye of reason, in the things he has made.

About the author (2005)


Charles Bigger is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Louisiana State University.

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