Lectures on history: second and concluding series, on the French Revolution, Volume 3

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W. Pickering, 1840 - France
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Page 22 - But now all is to be changed. All the pleasing illusions/ which made power gentle, and obedience liberal, which harmonized the different shades of life, and which, by a bland assimilation, incorporated into politics the sentiments which beautify and soften private society, are to be dissolved by this new conquering empire of light and reason.
Page 399 - Every year of its duration has teemed with fresh proofs of its utility and its blessings; and although our territory has stretched out wider and wider and our population spread farther and farther, they have not outrun its protection or its benefits. It has been to us all a copious fountain of national, social, and personal happiness.
Page 399 - When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood!
Page 81 - But what is liberty without wisdom and without virtue ? It is the greatest of all possible evils ; for it is folly, vice, and madness, without tuition or restraint.
Page 401 - No ! if these columns fall, they will be raised not again. Like the Coliseum and the Parthenon, they will be destined to a mournful, a melancholy immortality. Bitterer tears, however, will flow over them, than were ever shed over the monuments of Roman or Grecian art ; for they will be the remnants of a more glorious edifice than Greece or Rome ever saw, — the edifice of constitutional American liberty.
Page 25 - We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason, because we suspect that this stock in each man is small and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations and of ages.
Page 23 - In the groves of their academy, at the end of every vista, you see nothing but the gallows.
Page 210 - The French people recognize the existence of the Supreme Being and the immortality of the soul...
Page 346 - When I see the spirit of liberty in action, I see a strong principle at work ; and this, for a while, is, all I can possibly know of it. The wild gas, the fixed air, is plainly broke loose: but we ought to suspend our judgment until the first effervescence is a little subsided, till the liquor is cleared, and until we see something deeper than the agitation of a troubled and frothy surface.
Page 328 - ... interpose a salutary check to all precipitate resolutions; they render deliberation a matter not of choice, but of necessity; they make all change a subject of compromise; which naturally begets moderation; they produce temperaments, preventing the sore evil of harsh, crude, unqualified reformations; and rendering all the headlong exertions of arbitrary power, in the few or in the many, for ever impracticable.

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