Miscellaneous Essays: By Archibald Alison

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Carey & Hart, 1845 - Europe - 390 pages
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Page 160 - Slow sinks, more lovely ere his race be run, Along Morea's hills the setting sun: Not, as in northern climes, obscurely bright, But one unclouded blaze of living light!
Page 365 - Their starting-point is different, and their courses are not the same; yet each of them seems to be marked out by the will of Heaven to sway the destinies of half the globe.
Page 71 - The sun was setting upon one of the rich grassy glades of that forest, which we have mentioned in the beginning of the chapter.
Page 71 - ... upon our imagination the recollection ; that it owes its dark luxuriance to the foul and festering remnants of mortality which ferment beneath. The daisy which sprinkles the sod, and the harebell which hangs over it, derive their pure nourishment from the dew of heaven ; and their growth impresses us with no degrading or disgusting recollections. Death has indeed been here, and its traces are before us ; but they are softened and deprived of their horror by our distance from the period when they...
Page 71 - The sun was now resting his huge disk upon the edge of the level ocean, and gilded the accumulation of towering clouds, through which he had travelled the livelong day, and which now assembled on all sides like misfortunes and disasters around a sinking empire, and falling monarch.
Page 21 - Salamis ! Their azure arches through the long expanse More deeply purpled meet his mellowing glance, And tenderest tints, along their summits driven, Mark his gay course, and own the hues of heaven ; Till, darkly shaded from the land and deep, Behind his Delphian cliff he sinks to sleep.
Page 363 - This gradual and continuous progress of the European race towards the Rocky Mountains has the solemnity of a providential event ; it is like a deluge of men rising unabatedly, and daily driven onward by the hand of God.
Page 71 - ... and copsewood of various descriptions, so closely as totally to intercept the level beams of the sinking sun ; in others, they receded from each other, forming those long sweeping vistas, in the intricacy of which the eye delights to lose itself, while imagination considers them as the paths to yet wilder scenes of silvan solitude.
Page 254 - But although, from the very first, we clearly discerned and forcibly pointed out the disastrous effects on the freedom, peace, and tranquillity, first of France, and then of the...
Page 365 - There are at the present time two great nations in the world, which started from different points, but seem to tend toward the same end. I allude to the Russians and the Americans.

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