General Physics: An Elementary Text-book for Colleges

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Macmillan, 1919 - Physics - 617 pages
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Page 343 - It is impossible for a selfacting machine, unaided by any external agency to convey heat from one body to another at a higher temperature, or heat cannot of itself pass from a colder to a warmer body.
Page 403 - ... be rushing up everywhere — and then fall as positively charged rain, because of the processes just explained. The negative electrons, in the meantime, are carried up into the higher portions of the cumulus, where they unite with the cloud particles and thereby facilitate their coalescence into negatively charged drops. Hence the heavy rain...
Page 82 - To every action there is always an equal and contrary reaction ; or the mutual actions of any two bodies are always equal and oppositely directed.
Page 189 - C. 6. That up to the level of 1 1 kilometres the relative percentages of the several gases, excepting water vapor, remain constant — a result, of course, of vertical convection. 7. That above 1 1 kilometres, where the temperature changes but little with elevation, and where vertical convection, therefore, is practically absent, the several gases are distributed according to their respective molecular weights. A number of atmospheric gases — neon, krypton, xenon, ozone, etc. — are omitted both...
Page 302 - Medium exceedingly more rare and subtile than the Air, and exceedingly more elastick and active? And doth it not readily pervade all Bodies? And is it not (by its elastick force) expanded through all the Heavens?
Page 301 - If in two large tall cylindrical Vessels of Glass inverted, two little Thermometers be suspended so as not to touch the Vessels, and the Air be drawn out of one of these Vessels, and these Vessels thus prepared be carried out of a cold place into a warm one ; the Thermometer in vacuo will grow warm as much and almost as soon as the Thermometer which is not in -vacuo.
Page 189 - ... 7. That above 11 kilometers, where the temperature changes but little with elevation, and where vertical convection, therefore, is practically absent, the several gases are distributed according to their respective molecular weights. A number of atmospheric gases — neon, krypton, xenon, ozone, etc., — are omitted both from Table I and from its accompanying figure. This is because all these occur, in the lower atmosphere, at any rate, in quantities 30 40 50 60 VOLUMC fin CINT Fio.
Page 328 - The pressure remaining the same, there is a definite boiling point for the free surface of every liquid ; and (provided the mass be stirred), however much heat be applied, the temperature of the whole remains at the boiling-point till the last particle is evaporated.
Page 403 - Now, a strong upward current of air is one of the most conspicuous features of the thunderstorm. It is always evident in the turbulent cauliflower heads of the cumulus cloud — the parent, presumably, of all thunderstorms. Besides, its inference is compelled by the occurrence of hail, a frequent thunderstorm phenomenon, whose formation requires the carrying of raindrops and the growing hailstones repeatedly to cold and therefore high altitudes. And from the existence of hail it is further inferred...
Page 115 - Before considering Newton's answer to this question, let us recall the fact that the dimensions of each of these planets are so small compared with their distances from the sun that they may be treated as particles. Newton showed by mathematical computation that if we suppose the sun to attract each of the planets with a force which varies directly as the mass of the planet, and 'inversely as the square of the distance between the planet and the sun, this supposition will explain, in the most satisfactory...

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