Portraits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain, Volume 5

Front Cover
Harding and Lepard, 1835 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxviii - OF BEDFORD*. This morning, timely rapt with holy fire, I thought to form unto my zealous Muse, What kind of creature I could most desire To honour, serve, and love, as Poets use. I meant to make her fair, and free, and wise, Of greatest blood, and yet more good than great ; I meant the day-star should not brighter rise, Nor lend like influence from his lucent seat. I meant she should be courteous, facile, sweet, Hating that solemn vice of greatness, pride ; I meant each softest virtue there should...
Page 233 - God's ordinances as the best guidance of their conscience gives them, and to tolerate them, though in some disconformity to ourselves. The book itself will tell us more at large, being published to the world, and dedicated to the parliament by him, who both for his life and for his death deserves, that what advice he left be not laid by without perusal.
Page 233 - He writing of Episcopacy and by the way treating of sects and schisms, left ye his vote, or rather now the...
Page 170 - ... so that though he used very frankly to deny, and would never suffer any man to depart from him with an opinion that he was inclined to gratify, when in truth he was not, holding that dissimulation to be the worst of lying ; yet the manner of it was so gentle and obliging, and his condescension such, to inform the persons whom he could not satisfy, that few departed from him with ill will, and ill wishes.
Page xxviii - ON LUCY, COUNTESS OF BEDFORD*. This morning, timely rapt with holy fire, I thought to form unto my zealous Muse, What kind of creature I could most desire To honour, serve, and love, as Poets use. I meant to make her fair, and free, and wise, Of greatest blood, and yet more good than great ; I meant the day-star should not brighter rise, Nor lend like influence from his lucent seat. I meant she should be courteous, facile, sweet, Hating that solemn vice of greatness, pride ; I meant each softest...
Page 13 - Then his ascent was so quick, that it seemed rather a flight than a growth; and he was such a darling of fortune, that he was at the top before he was well seen at the bottom; and, as if he had been born a favourite, he was supreme the first month he came to court...
Page 150 - Baldi came to the presencechamber door, he was requested to lay aside his long rapier, — which, Italian-like, he then wore ; — and being entered the chamber, he found there with the king three or four Scotch lords standing distant in several corners of the chamber ; at the sight of whom he made a stand ; which the king observing, bade him be bold and deliver his message ; for he would undertake for the secrecy of all that were present.
Page 204 - ... himself in parliament ; and if they should fall upon him, he being at a distance, whatsoever they should conclude against him he might the better avoid, and retire from any danger, having the liberty of being out of their hands, and to go over to Ireland, or to some other place, where he might be most serviceable to his majesty...
Page 184 - Strafford's life should be preserved ; and to procure his revenue to be settled, as amply as any of his progenitors, the which he intended so really, that, to my knowledge, he had it in design to endeavour to obtain an act for the setting up the excise in England, as the only natural means to advance the King's profit.
Page 195 - ... by the other ; for he had a readiness of conception, and sharpness of expression, which made his learning thought more than in truth it was. His first inclinations and addresses to the court were only to establish his greatness in the country where he apprehended some acts of power from the lord Savile, who had been his rival always there, and of late had strengthened himself by being...

Bibliographic information