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Books Books 1 - 10 of 36 on The general effect of the evidence which has been submitted to the reader seems hardly....
" The general effect of the evidence which has been submitted to the reader seems hardly to admit of doubt. Yet, in spite of evidence, many will still imagine to themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which... "
Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen - Page 187
1852
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 90

1849
...themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant ' country than the England in which we live. It may at first ' sight seem strange that society,...forward with eager speed, should be constantly looking back ' with tender regret. But these two propensities, inconsistent ' as they may appear, can easily...
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The Western Quarterly Review

1849
...themselves the England of the , Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which we live. It may at first sight seem strange that society, while...resolved into the same principle. Both spring from an impatience of the state in which we actually are. That impatience while it stimulates us to surpass...
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The History of England from the Accession of James II, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1849
...themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which we live. It may at first sight seem strange that society, while...should be constantly looking backward with tender • Ward's London Spy. regret. But these two propensities, inconsistent as they maj appear, can easily...
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The Christian Examiner and Religious Miscellany

Liberalism (Religion) - 1849
...themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which we live. It may, at first sight, seem strange, that society,...constantly moving forward with eager speed, should be consiantly looking backward with tender regret. But these two propensities, inconsistent as they may...
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The History of England from the Accession of James II.

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1849
...themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which we live. It may at first sight seem strange that society, while...constantly moving forward with eager speed, should bo constantly looking backward with tender regret. But these two propensities, inconsistent as they...
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The History of England: From the Accession of James the Second, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay - Great Britain - 1849
...to themselves the Engh»ppm«» jgjyj of tjje smarts ag a more pleasant country than the Engwe live. It may at first sight seem strange that society, while constantly moving forward with eager speed, ihould be constantly looking backward with tender regret. CHAP. But these two propensities, inconsistent...
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Essays on Political and Social Science: Contributed Chiefly to the ..., Volume 1

William Rathbone Greg - Social sciences - 1853
...themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which we live. It may at first sight seem strange that society, while...forward with eager speed, should be constantly looking back with tender regret. But these two propensities, inconsistent as they may appear, can easily be...
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Longer exercises in Latin prose composition, chiefly tr. from the writings ...

John William Donaldson - 1853
...constantly moving forward with eager speed,6 should be constantly looking backward with tender regret,7 but these two propensities, inconsistent as they may appear, can easily be resolved into the same principle8 — both spring from our impatience of the state in which we actually are.9 That impatience,...
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The history of England from the accession of James II, Volume 1

Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay Macaulay - 1855
...themselves the England of the Stuarts as a more pleasant country than the England in which we live. It may at first sight seem strange that society, while...regret. But these two propensities, inconsistent as they ma) y appear, can easily be resolved into the same principle. Both I spring from our impatience of...
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Exercises on A selection of English synonyms [by E.J. Whately] edited by ...

Charles Hains Gunn, Elizabeth Jane Whately - 1859
...constantly looking backward with tender (sorrow, 102). But these two propensities, (inconsistent, 74) as they may appear, can easily be resolved into the same principle. The (feeling, 141) of (pity) is imperceptibly weakened (with, 5) the sight and practice of domestic...
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