Buffon's Natural history, corrected and enlarged by J. Wright. (To which are added Elements of botany).

Front Cover
1831
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 257 - the ground, the Sloth is an exception to this rule, and that his history must be written while he is in the tree. " This singular animal is destined by nature to be produced, to live, and to die, in the trees; and, to do justice to him, naturalists must examine him in his upper element.
Page 259 - by means of his fore legs, at a pretty good pace, and he invariably shaped his course towards the nearest tree. But if I put him upon a smooth and well trodden part of the road, he appeared to be in trouble and distress: his
Page 260 - hang head downwards like the vampyre. When asleep, he supports himself on a branch parallel to the earth. He first seizes the branch with one arm and then with the other; and, after that, brings
Page 260 - in this position. Now, had he a tail, he would be at a loss to know what to do with it in this position: were he to draw it up with his legs, it would
Page 16 - heels, couching every now and then as if to measure the distance and strength of his enemies. This is the moment to shoot him fairly in the forehead, or some other mortal part. If they continue to wound him
Page 15 - or Mulatto Hottentots, who resided at that time upon our territory as tenants or herdsmen,—an active and enterprising, though rather an unsteady, race of men. Our friends the Tarkaboors, many of whom are excellent Lion hunters, were all too far distant to assist us, our nearest
Page 45 - I was at Jaffna, at the northern extremity of the island of Ceylon, in the beginning of the year 1819 (says the writer), when, one morning, my servant called me an hour or two before my usual time, with " Master, master! people sent for master's dogs—tiger
Page 391 - you have got for him, as he munches cakes and comfits with epicurean gout; and if the door is ajar, he will gravely take his station behind your chair at meal time, like a lackey, giving you an admonitory kick every now and then, if you fail to help him as well as yourself.
Page 187 - with a second fatal discharge. The consternation of the deer increases; they run to and fro in the utmost confusion, and sometimes a great part of the herd is destroyed within the space of a few hundred yards. In
Page 9 - and was aware that a sword would be no effective defence in a struggle for life with such an antagonist! But he had heard that even the Bengal tiger might be sometimes checked by looking him firmly in the face. He did so: in a few minutes, the tiger, which appeared prepared to make his final spring, grew disturbed— slunk

Bibliographic information