Memoir of the Rev. John Stevens Henslow, M.A., F.L.S., F.G.S., F.C.P.S.: Late Rector of Hitcham and Professor of Botany in the University of Cambridge

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John Van Voorst, 1862 - Botanists - 278 pages
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Includes recollections of John Henslow by Charles Darwin, p. 51-55.
 

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Page 153 - No doubt but ye are the people, And wisdom shall die with you. But I have understanding as well as you ; I am not inferior to you : Yea, who knoweth not such things as these?
Page 227 - ... who, in his brief day, had been eminent in some way or other — for his wealth or his rank, his valour or his position in the social system. No one of little estimation in the eyes of his fellow men would have been buried in the style of this Roman — in a leaden coffin — within a solidly built vault — and with a monumental mound of earth piled over it, which needed the united efforts of a numerous company for its erection. I think we shall not be wandering very far from the truth in supposing...
Page 51 - Henslow, for all who cared for any branch of natural history were equally encouraged by him. Nothing could be more simple, cordial, and unpretending than the encouragement which he afforded to all young naturalists. I soon became intimate with him, for he had a remarkable power of making the young feel completely at ease with him ; though we were all awe-struck with the amount of his knowledge. Before I saw him, I heard one young man sum up his attaintments by simply saying that he knew everything.
Page 54 - During the years when I associated so much with Professor Henslow, I never once saw his temper even ruffled. He never took an ill-natured view of any one's character, though very far from blind to the foibles of others. It always struck me that his mind could not be even touched by any paltry feeling of vanity, envy, or jealousy. With all this equability of temper and remarkable benevolence, there was no insipidity of character. A man must have been blind not to have perceived that beneath this placid...
Page 54 - It always struck me that his mind could not be well touched by any paltry feeling of envy, vanity, or jealousy. With all this equability of temper, and remarkable benevolence, there was no insipidity of character. A man must have been blind not to have perceived that beneath this placid exterior there was a vigorous and determined will. When principle came into play, no power on earth could have turned him...
Page 39 - I do not doubt that the results were, in their way, as efficient as we obtain now in more stately laboratories. The most interesting feature about his teaching was not, however, its academic aspect, but the use he made of botany as a general educational instrument.
Page 227 - ... legions were finally recalled from enervated Britain, in the year of our Lord 426. I argue thus in favour of the late period at which this Tumulus was erected. The Romans in the earlier periods of the Empire burnt their dead, almost universally. The other Tumuli at Rougham afforded examples of this custom, with the usual accompaniments of those vessels in which the offerings to the manes of the deceased had been conveyed to the bustum,* and deposited with the burning lamp, to cheer them on their...
Page 192 - Although the bunt-fungus confines its attacks to the young seed, it seems to be a condition essential to its propagation that it should be introduced into the plant during the early stages of its growth, and that its sporules are most readily absorbed by the root during the germination of the seed from which the plant has sprung.
Page 51 - I went to Cambridge early in the year 1828, and soon became acquainted, through some of my brother entomologists, with Prof. Henslow, for all who cared for any branch of natural history were equally encouraged by him.
Page 63 - Not only was the cry raised of ' Henslow, common informer ! ' whenever he appeared in the streets, but the same obnoxious words were placarded upon the walls in such large and enduring characters, that, even to this day (1801), more than a quarter of a century after the transaction, they are still distinctly legible in some places. They were seen, and smilingly pointed out to a friend...

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