A Gardener's Alphabet

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2000 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
33 Reviews
Revealing the variety of life underground, the bright comfort of a greenhouse on a winter's day, or the anticipation of starting seeds indoors in early spring, this striking alphabet book celebrates the simple joys of gardening. Without neglecting the frustrations -- the nibbling critters and the toil -- or wry, humorous moments spent in the garden. Mary Azarian's spare words and lovely woodcuts capture the essence of turning a bare plot of ground into fragrant flowers and lush vegetables and trees. Her depictions of insects, manure, and compost piles are as delightful as her fountains, pumpkins, and Queen Anne's lace. Whether we are young or old, our gardens both exhaust and renew us. They are our source of magic and wonder and perhaps our best way to live closer to the land and to the rhythm of the seasons.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - amartino1208 - LibraryThing

This book teaches children about things they would find in a garden by incorporating the alphabet. For every letter of the alphabet, children learn about a different aspect of the gardening experience ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kbartholomew1 - LibraryThing

A Gardener's Alphabet is an alphabet book which uses words that are found in a garden. When teaching about plants and gardens, I would use this book. The book is an informational book that helps children become familiar with the garden vocabulary. Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Caldecott Medalist Mary Azarian is a consummate gardener and a skilled and original woodblock artist. Many of her prints are heavily influenced by her love of gardening, and her turn-of-the-century farmhouse is surrounded by gardens that reveal an artist's vision. Mary Azarian received the 1999 Caldecott Medal for SNOWFLAKE BENTLEY, written by Jacqueline Briggs Martin. She lives, skis, and gardens in Vermont.

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