The Mansion

Front Cover
ARC MANOR, Dec 1, 2008 - Fiction - 48 pages
14 Reviews
From the edge of the hill, where John Weightman sat, he could see the travelers, in little groups or larger companies, gathering from time to time by the different paths, and making the ascent. They were all clothed in white, and the form of their garments was strange to him; it was like some old picture. They passed him, group after group, talking quietly together or singing; not moving in haste, but with a certain air of eagerness and joy as if they were glad to be on their way to an appointed place. They did not stay to speak to him, but they looked at him often and spoke to one another as they looked; and now and then one of them would smile and beckon him a friendly greeting, so that he felt they would like him to be with them. (from "The Mansion")

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
8
3 stars
2
2 stars
2
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bjace - LibraryThing

A pillar of the community, a man of rectitude and charity, differs with his son about several matters. The son wants to give up business for a while and to assist a friend of his in need, both of ... Read full review

Review: The Mansion

User Review  - Abby - Goodreads

This was a good book about building up worldly wealth vs. building up wealth in heaven. A quick read with a good moral. I loved the scriptural references. I think we all have to struggle with what ... Read full review

About the author (2008)

Henry van Dyke (1852-1933) was an American author, educator, and clergyman. He graduated from Princeton University, 1873, and from Princeton Theological Seminary, 1874 and served as a professor of English literature at Princeton between 1899 and 1923. In 1908-09 Dr. Van Dyke was an American lecturer at the University of Paris. By appointment of President Wilson he became Minister to the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 1913. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters and received many other honors. He chaired the committee that wrote the first Presbyterian printed liturgy, The Book of Common Worship of 1906. Among his popular writings are the two Christmas stories The Other Wise Man (1896) and The First Christmas Tree (1897). Various religious themes of his work are also expressed in his poetry, hymns and the essays collected in Little Rivers (1895) and Fisherman's Luck (1899). He compiled several short stories in The Blue Flower named after a story by Novalis in 1902. He also contributed a chapter to the collaborative novel, The Whole Family (1908).

Bibliographic information