A Treatise of Human Nature

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Oxford University Press, 2000 - Philosophy - 728 pages
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David Hume's comprehensive attempt to base philosophy on a new, observationally grounded study of human nature is one of the most important texts in Western philosophy. The Treatise first explains how we form such concepts as cause and effect, external existence, and personal identity, and how we create compelling but unverifiable beliefs in the entities represented by these concepts. It then offers a novel account of the passions, explains freedom and necessity as they apply to human choices and actions, and concludes with a detailed explanation of how we distinguish between virtue and vice. The volume features Hume's own abstract of the Treatise, a substantial introduction, extensive annotations, a glossary of terms, a comprehensive index, and suggestions for further reading.

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Contents

How to Use this Book 13
103
Editors Introduction 19
109
OF THE UNDERSTANDING
116
Copyright

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About the author (2000)


David Norton is Macdonald Professor of Moral Philosophy and Co-director of the Hume Society/National Endowment for the Humanities Institute on the Philosophy of David Hume.

Mary J. Norton is an independent scholar

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