Napoleon's Wars: An International History

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Penguin, Oct 27, 2009 - History - 656 pages
2 Reviews
A glorious?and conclusive?chronicle of the wars waged by one of the most polarizing figures in military history

Acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic as a new standard on the subject, this sweeping, boldly written history of the Napoleonic era reveals its central protagonist as a man driven by an insatiable desire for fame, and determined ?to push matters to extremes.? More than a myth-busting portrait of Napoleon, however, it offers a panoramic view of the armed conflicts that spread so quickly out of revolutionary France to countries as remote as Sweden and Egypt. As it expertly moves through conflicts from Russia to Spain, Napoleon?s Wars proves to be history writing equal to its subject?grand and ambitious?that will reframe the way this tumultuous era is understood.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Hae-Yu - LibraryThing

General histories of the age focus about 80% on Napoleon, throw in some Nelson and Wellington, and round out with the other players - Russia, Austria, Prussia, etc. This telling focuses from the ... Read full review

NAPOLEON'S WARS: An International History, 1803-1815

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A measured reassessment of Napoleonic imperialism.Esdaile (History/Univ. of Liverpool; Fighting Napoleon: Guerillas, Bandits and Adventurers in Spain, 1808-1814, 2004, etc.) notes that Bonaparte's ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

List of Maps
The Napoleonic Wars in Historical Perspective
From Brumaire to Amiens
The Peace of Amiens
Towards the Third Coalition
Austerlitz
Zenith of Empire
Across the Pyrenees
From Madrid to Vienna
The Alliance that Failed
Notes
Glossary of Place Names
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Charles Esdaile is Professor of History at the University of Liverpool. His The Peninsular War was acclaimed by many reviewers, including Andrew Roberts and Bernard Cornwell.

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