The Problems of Neutrality when the World is at War: A History of Our Relations with Germany and Great Britain as Detailed in the Documents that Passed Between the United States and the Two Great Belligerent Powers, Part 1

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1917 - Germany - 431 pages
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Page 76 - Thirdly, to exercise due diligence in its own ports and waters, and, as to all persons within its jurisdiction, to prevent any violation of the foregoing obligations and duties.
Page 420 - ... the ultimate peace of the world and for the liberation of its peoples, the German peoples included; for the rights of nations great and small and the privilege of men everywhere to choose their way of life and of obedience. The world must be made safe for democracy. Its peace must be planted upon the tested foundations of political liberty.
Page 418 - Neutrality is no longer feasible or desirable where the peace of the world is involved and the freedom of its peoples, and the menace to that peace and freedom lies in the existence of autocratic governments backed by organized force which is controlled wholly by their will, not by the will of their people.
Page 149 - And the paths of the sea must alike in law and in fact be free. The freedom of the seas is the sine qua non of peace, equality, and cooperation.
Page 419 - Cunningly contrived plans of deception or aggression, carried, it may be, from generation to generation, can be worked out and kept from the light only within the privacy of courts or behind the carefully guarded confidences of a narrow and privileged class. They are happily impossible where public opinion commands and insists upon full information concerning all the nation's affairs. A steadfast concert for peace can never be maintained except by a partnership of democratic nations.
Page 332 - Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 416 - I was for a little while unable to believe that such things would in fact be done by any Government that had hitherto subscribed to the humane practices of civilized nations.
Page 185 - ... have been received. Each contracting power is entitled to have access to this register and to be supplied with duly certified extracts from it.
Page 423 - President be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States...
Page 184 - In the event of one of the Contracting Powers wishing to denounce the present Convention, the denunciation shall be notified in writing to the...

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