Two Treatises of Government

Front Cover
C. and J. Rivington, 1824 - Civil rights - 277 pages
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Contents

I
4
II
7
III
14
IV
19
V
36
VI
41
VII
59
VIII
65
XVII
144
XVIII
159
XIX
175
XX
186
XXI
203
XXII
207
XXIII
208
XXV
216

IX
67
XI
82
XII
84
XIII
130
XIV
131
XV
139
XVI
143
XXVI
218
XXVIII
226
XXIX
232
XXX
235
XXXI
247
XXXII
249
XXXIV
256

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Page 22 - And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Page 146 - I think it is plain that property in that too is acquired as the former. As much land as a man tills, plants, improves, cultivates, and can use the product of, so much is his property. He by his labour does, as it were, enclose it from the common.
Page 24 - Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands ; thou hast put all things under his feet : All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field ; The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.
Page 91 - Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac.
Page 202 - There wants an established, settled, known law, received and allowed by common consent to be the standard of right and wrong and the common measure to decide all controversies between them; for though the law of nature be plain and intelligible to all rational creatures, yet men, being...
Page 130 - To understand political power right, and derive it from its original, we must consider, what state all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave, or depending upon the will of any other man.
Page 112 - These are the families of the sons of Noah, after their generations, in their nations : and by these were the nations divided in the earth after the flood.
Page 49 - If a man have a stubborn and rebellious son, which will not obey the voice of his father or the voice of his mother, and that when they have chastened him, will not hearken unto them...
Page 106 - And the LORD hath blessed my master greatly, and he is become great: and he hath given him flocks, and herds, and silver, and gold, and menservants, and maidservants, and camels, and asses.
Page 141 - a liberty for every one to do what he lists, to live as he pleases, and not to be tied by any laws"; but freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power erected in it...

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