A Companion to the Flavian Age of Imperial Rome

Front Cover
Andrew Zissos
John Wiley & Sons, Mar 7, 2016 - Literary Criticism - 624 pages
A Companion to the Flavian Age of Imperial Rome provides a systematic and comprehensive examination of the political, economic, social, and cultural nuances of the Flavian Age (69–96 CE).

  • Includes contributions from over two dozen Classical Studies scholars organized into six thematic sections
  • Illustrates how economic, social, and cultural forces interacted to create a variety of social worlds within a composite Roman empire
  • Concludes with a series of appendices that provide detailed chronological and demographic information and an extensive glossary of terms
  • Examines the Flavian Age more broadly and inclusively than ever before incorporating coverage of often neglected groups, such as women and non-Romans within the Empire
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction 1
3
Sources and Evidence 17
17
Author and Authority in the Prefaces
24
The Remarkable Rise of the Flavians
43
The Emperor Vespasian
60
The Emperor Titus
76
The Emperor Domitian
92
Imperial ImageMaking
109
Education in the Flavian Age
313
Restoration and Renewal
327
The Aesthetics of the Everyday in Flavian Art and Literature
344
Paradox and Wonder
361
Literary Culture
376
Historicizing the Flavian Epics
395
Social Life and Values in Martials
412
Flavian Greek Literature
450

Sculpture and Coinage
129
Remaking Rome
148
The Economic Impact of Flavian Rule
189
Frontiers Security and Military Policy
207
Centers and Peripheries
223
Flavian Judea
239
Flavian Britain
255
Prejudices and Engagements
277
Women in Flavian Rome
296
Lost Literature
469
The Flavian Legacy
487
Vesuvius and Pompeii
515
Reception of Flavian Literature
535
Chronology
560
Glossary of Terms and Expressions
573
Index of Passages
591
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

Andrew Zissos is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles on Latin epic, editor of a commentary on Book 1 of Valerius Flaccus' Argonautica (2008), and co-editor, with Ingo Gildenhard, of Transformative Change in Western Thought: A History of Metamorphosis from Homer to Hollywood (2013).

Bibliographic information