Molecular Cell Biology

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Macmillan, 2008 - Science - 1150 pages
7 Reviews
With its acclaimed author team, cutting-edge content, emphasis on medical relevance, and coverage based on landmark experiments, Molecular Cell Biology has justly earned an impeccable reputation as an authoritative and exciting text. The new Sixth Edition features two new coauthors, expanded coverage of immunology and development, and new media tools for students and instructors.
 

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the concepts of proteins is good but diagrams are in sufficient

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very bad . information is not sufficient . picture qlt. bad

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Contents

CONTENTS IN BRIEF Part I Chemical and Molecular Foundations
1
The Diversity and Commonality Investigating Cells and Their Parts
20
The Molecules of a Cell Approaches
27
Chemical Foundations
31
Stereoisomers in medication p
33
Hydrogen Bonds Determine the Water Solubility and Reduction Reactions 59
37
Chemical Reactions in Cells Are at Steady State
50
Protein Structure and Function
63
Toxic Byproducts of Electron Transport Can Photoelectron Transport
521
ATPADP Exchange Across the Inner Mitochondrial Photorespiration Which Competes with
527
Moving Proteins into Membranes and Organelles
533
Photosystems Comprise a Reaction Center and Translocon Is Driven by Energy Released During
539
ATP Hydrolysis Powers Posttranslational Sorting of Peroxisomal Proteins 567
540
Multipass Proteins Have Multiple Internal
546
Emphysema and protein misfolding p 555
555
Defective peroxisome assembly can lead to craniofacial
568

Biological Fluids Have Characteristic pH Values 51 Planar Peptide Bonds Limit the Shapes into
74
Diseases of protein misfolding p
77
The AG of a Reaction Can Be Calculated Carries Out Catalysis
80
Drugs can inhibit protein activity p
84
Enzymes Called Molecular Motors Convert Energy QH Purifying Detecting
92
Ubiquitin Marks Cytosolic Proteins for Degradation
98
Noncovalent Binding of Calcium and GTP Are Widely
105
Genetics and Molecular Biology
111
BASIC MOLECULAR GENETIC Eukaryotic DNA
122
DNA Can Undergo Reversible Strand Separation 116 The Folded Structure of tRNA Promotes Its Decoding
129
MethionyltRNAiMET Recognizes the AUG Start Codon 133 5 MOLECULAR GENETIC TECHNIQUES 165
133
Colon cancer p 148
148
Viruses such as HIV and HPV attack our cells p 159
159
Molecular Genetic Techniques
165
Translation Is Terminated by Release Factors Recessive and Dominant Mutant Alleles Generally
166
Hemoglobin alleles affect sicklecell anemia and malaria
167
DNA Replication Usually Occurs Bidirectionally from Genetic Suppression and Synthetic Lethality
173
Base Excision Repairs TG Mismatches and ProteinCoding Genes
179
Most Viral Host Ranges Are Narrow 154
191
DNA microarrays are powerful diagnostic tools in medicine
193
Many Inherited Diseases Show One of Three Major
199
Normal Yeast Genes Can Be Replaced with Mutant
205
Knockout mice are used to study cystic fibrosis p 208
208
Genes Genomics and Chromosomes
215
Heavily Used Gene Products Are Encoded by Multiple
221
Microsatellites cause neuromuscular diseases p 224
224
DNA Transposons Are Present in Prokaryotes
227
Mobility of LI elements causes many genetic diseases p 232
232
Other Retrotransposed RNAs Are Found in Genomic
234
Antibiotics have different effects on mitochondrial
240
Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Gene Copy TwoComponent Regulatory Systems 275
246
During Metaphase Chromosomes Can Be PromoterProximal Elements Help Regulate
258
Using human telomerase inhibitors to treat cancer p 264
264
Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression
269
Centromere Sequences Vary Greatly in Length 263 Transcription
286
Absence of represser activity in genes causes cancer p 290
290
Bacteria 271
293
General Transcription Factors Position
296
Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockaynes syndrome p 298
298
Repressers Can Direct Histone Deacetylation
303
The Yeast TwoHybrid System Exploits Activator Flexibility
310
PromoterProximal Pausing of RNA Polymerase II
316
Posttranscriptional Gene Control
323
The 5 Cap Is Added to Nascent RNAs Shortly After
325
Exon skipping and spinal muscle atrophy p 333
333
Splicing Repressers and Activators Control Splicing
339
Microsatellites regions and neurological diseases p 340
340
PremRNAs in Spliceosomes Are Not Exported from
345
Thalassemia p 346
346
Micro RNAs Repress Translation of Specific mRNAs
347
mTOR pathway and human cancers p 355
355
Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Promotes Translation PrerRNA Genes Function as Nucleolar Organizers
359
Cell Structure and Function
371
TaySachs disease p 374
374
Structure and Localizing Proteins Centrifugation Can Separate Many Types
392
El Isolation Culture and Differentiation LipidBinding Motifs Help Target Peripheral Proteins to the Membrane 427
394
Some Cell Lines Undergo Differentiation in Culture 398 Small Cytosolic Proteins Facilitate Movement
400
Biomembrane Structure
409
HAT Medium Is Commonly Used to Isolate Takes Place on Organelle Membranes
431
Atherosclerosis and cholesterol p 432
432
Transmembrane Transport of Ions and Small Molecules
437
Most Transmembrane Proteins Have The Human Genome Encodes a Family of Sugar
443
Aquaporin vasopressin and diabetes insipidus p 445
445
Different Classes of Pumps Exhibit Characteristic Cardiac Muscle Cells 468
447
Bacterial Permeases Are ABC Proteins That Simple Rehydration Therapy Depends on
454
ABC proteins and cystic fibrosis p 455
455
Na+K+ ATPase and heart muscle contractions p 468
468
Cellular Energetics
479
The Membrane Potential in Animal Cells Depends During Glycolysis Stage I Cytosolic Enzymes
481
Na+ Entry into Mammalian Cells Has a Negative In Stage II Pyruvate Is Oxidized to CO2 and High
487
Cyanide inhibits cellular respiration p 498
498
ATPADP antiporter activity and herbal remedies p 509
509
Stepwise Electron Transport Efficiently Releases the Complexes Increase the Efficiency
515
The Topology of a Membrane Protein Often
571
Vesicular Traffic Secretion and Endocytosis
579
Amphipathic NTerminal Signal Sequences Direct Vesicular Traffic
586
Cystic fibrosis p 593
593
COPI Vesicles Mediate Retrograde Transport within
594
Mannose 6Phosphate Residues Target Soluble
600
Lysosomal storage diseases p 602
602
ReceptorMediated Endocytosis
606
Familial hypercholesterolemia FH and LDL cholesterol
608
Directing Membrane Proteins
612
Signal Transduction and ShortTerm Cellular Responses
623
Asthma treatment p 629
629
QU General Elements of G Protein
635
Bacterial toxins and G proteins p 639
639
Light Activates GtYtCoupled Rhodopsins
641
cAMP Activates Protein Kinase A by Releasing Transcription Factors 670
647
Calcium Ion Release from the Endoplasmic Signals 677
654
Nitroglycerin and angina p 556
660
Signaling Pathways That Control Gene Activity
665
Integrating Responses of Cells Ligand Binding Leads to Phosphorylation and Activation of Intrinsic Kinase in RTKs
680
Conserved Domains Are Important for Binding Signal
682
Signals Pass from Activated Ras to a Cascade
688
Phosphoinositides as Signal
694
Pathways That Involve SignalInduced
703
Microfilaments
713
Actin Polymerization in Vitro Proceeds in Three Steps
719
Intracellular Movements Can Be Powered by Actin
726
Structures
728
Microtubules and Intermediate Filaments
757
Walks Hand Over Hand Down an Actin
763
Microtubule
769
Migrating Cells Are Steered by Chemotactic Kinesins and Dyneins Cooperate in the Transport
775
Eukaryotic Cilia and Flagella Contain Long Doublet During Cell Migration 797
777
Integrating Cells into Tissues
801
Mitosis Can Be Divided into Six Phases 782 The Extracellular Matrix Participates in Adhesion
805
Anaphase B Separates Poles by the Combined Tight Junctions Seal Off Body Cavities and Restrict
814
Plant Cells Reorganize Their Microtubules
820
Hyaluronan Resists Compression Facilitates Cell Migration Interactions
829
Adhesive Interactions in Motile Loosening of the Cell Wall Permits Plant Cell
840
639
846
Cell Growth and Development
847
MPF Components Are Conserved Between Lower
860
Control of Mitosis by Cyclins and Unlinking of Sister Chromatids Initiates Anaphase
867
Degradation of the SPhase Inhibitor Triggers
876
Cell Birth Lineage and Death
905
Multiple CDKs and Cyclins Regulate Passage of Heterochronic Mutants Provide Clues About Control
909
Cyclin A Is Required for DMA Synthesis and CDK1 Meristems Are Niches for Stem Cells in Postnatal
920
Key Features Distinguish Meiosis from Mitosis 892 Two Classes of Regulatory Factors Act in Concert
926
Proteins That Regulate Asymmetry Are Localized
931
Programmed Cell Death Occurs Through Apoptosis
937
Tumor Necrosis Factor and Related Death Signals
943
The Molecular Cell Biology of Development
949
Differences Between Segments Are Controlled
978
JJJJ CellType Specification in Early
985
Limb Development Depends on Integration
991
CLASSIC EXPERIMENT 22 1 using Lethal
999
Nerve Cells
1001
Information Flows Between Neurons via Gap Junctions Also Allow Neurons to Communicate 1025
1005
Action Potentials Jump from Node to Node Molecules 1043
1013
Neurotransmitters Are Transported into Synaptic
1019
Immunology
1055
Influx of Ca2+ Triggers Release of Routes and Replicate at Different Sites
1057
Each B Cell Produces a Unique Clonally Distributed TCell Receptors Are Very Diverse with Many
1089
Cytotoxic T Cells Carry the CDS Coreceptor
1095
The MHC and Antigen Vaccines Elicit Protective Immunity Against
1101
Cancer
1107
A Multihit Model of Cancer Induction Is Supported CellCycle Controls 1134
1114
CancerCausing Viruses Contain Oncogenes
1121
Oncogenic Mutations in Growth
1127
Animal Cells Produce Their Own External
16
Cells Change Shape and Move 16 EO Covalent Bonds and Noncovalent
32
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About the author (2008)

Harvey Lodish is Professor of Biology and Professor of Bioengineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Dr. Lodish is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was President (2004) of the American Society for Cell Biology. He is well known for his work on cell membrane physiology, particularly the biosynthesis of many cell-surface proteins, and on the cloning and functional analysis of several cell-surface receptor proteins, such as the erythropoietin and TGF-ß receptors. His lab also studies hematopoietic stem cells and has identified novel proteins that support their proliferation. Dr. Lodish teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in cell biology and biotechnology.   Arnold Berk is Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and a member of the Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Berk is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is one of the original discoverers of RNA splicing and of mechanisms for gene control in viruses. His laboratory studies the molecular interactions that regulate transcription nitiation in mammalian cells, focusing particular attention on transcription factors encoded by oncogenes and tumor suppressors. He teaches introductory courses in molecular biology and virology and an advanced course in cell biology of the nucleus.   Chris A. Kaiser is Professor and Head of the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His laboratory uses genetic and cell biological methods to understand the basic processes of how newly synthesized membrane and secretory proteins are folded and stored in the compartments of the secretory pathway. Dr. Kaiser is recognized as a top undergraduate educator at MIT, where he has taught genetics to undergraduates for many years.   Monty Krieger is the Whitehead Professor in the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For his innovative teaching of undergraduate biology and human physiology as well as graduate cell biology courses, he has received numerous awards. His laboratory has made contributions to our understanding of membrane trafficking through the Golgi apparatus and has cloned and characterized receptor proteins important for the movement of cholesterol into and out of cells, including the HDL receptor.   Matthew P. Scott is Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics and Bioengineering at Stanford University School of Medicine and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a past president of the Society for Developmental Biology. He is known for his work in developmental biology and genetics, particularly in areas of cell-cell signaling and homeobox genes and for discovering the roles of developmental regulators in cancer. Dr. Scott teaches cell and developmental biology to undergraduate students, development and disease mechanisms to medical students and developmental biology to graduate students at Stanford University.   Anthony Bretscher is Professor of Cell Biology at Cornell University. His laboratory is well known for identifying and characterizing new components of the actin cytoskeleton, and elucidating their biological functions in relation to cell polarity and membrane traffic. For this work, his laboratory exploits biochemical, genetic and cell biological approaches in two model systems, vertebrate epithelial cells and the budding yeast. Dr. Bretscher teaches cell biology to graduate students at Cornell University.   Hidde Ploegh is Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. One of the world’s leading researchers in immune system behavior, Dr. Ploegh studies the various tactics that viruses employ to evade our immune responses, and the ways in which our immune system distinguishes friend from foe. Dr. Ploegh teaches immunology to undergraduate students at Harvard University and MIT.

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