The History of the Last Trial by Jury for Atheism in England: A Fragment of Autobiography, Submitted for the Perusal of Her Majesty's Attorney General and the British Clergy

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J. Watson, 1850 - Atheism - 100 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
20
III
67
IV
85

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Page 50 - In all human institutions a smaller evil is allowed to procure a greater good; as in politics, a province may be given away, to secure a kingdom ; in medicine, a limb may be lopt off, to preserve the body. But in religion, the law is written and inflexible, never to do evil.
Page 49 - till we have put on, as the elect of God, bowels of mercy, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering, forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, as
Page 10 - There is a rabble amongst the gentry as well as the commonalty ; a sort of plebeian heads, whose fancy moves with the same wheel as these: men in the same level with mechanics, though their fortunes do somewhat gild their infirmities, and their purses compound for their follies.
Page 36 - teach them. There are dreadful punishments enacted against thieves, but it were much better to make such good provisions by which, every man might be put in a method how to live, and so be preserved from the fatal necessity of stealing, and of
Page 22 - day of May, in the fifth year of the reign of our lady the Queen, with force and arms, at the parish aforesaid, in the county aforesaid, in the presence and hearing of divers liege subjects of our said lady the Queen, maliciously, unlawfully, and wickedly did compose, speak, utter, pronounce, and publish
Page 50 - While I was on my way back to Rome, some merchants informed me that the English Jesuits had formed a plot against me, if I returned to Rome, because I had spoken too freely of religion ; for it was a rule which I laid down to myself in those places, never to be the first to begin any conversation on
Page 54 - attempting to move in arrest of judgment, the court declared they would not suffer it to be debated whether to write against Christianity in general was an offence punishable in the temporal courts
Page 56 - month ; to stand twice in the pillory with a paper on his forehead, inscribed Blasphemy ; to be sent to the House of Correction to hard labour for a year ; to pay a fine of 6s. 8d., and to find security himself in 100, and two sureties in 50 each for his good behaviour during life.*
Page 45 - It will follow from hence, that God is free from everything that is contrary to happiness: and so that in strict propriety of speech there is no such thing as any pain, grief, or trouble in God. ' 1. That God is a perfectly happy being, in the most absolute and highest sense possible. '3.
Page 22 - force and arms, at the parish aforesaid, in the county aforesaid, in the presence and hearing of divers liege subjects of our said lady the Queen, maliciously,

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