The Cambridge Companion to Homer

Front Cover
Robert Fowler, Robert Louis Fowler
Cambridge University Press, Oct 14, 2004 - History - 419 pages
3 Reviews
Pt. 1. The poems and their narrator. The Iliad : an unpredictable classic / Donald Lateiner ; The Odyssey and its explorations / Michael Silk ; The story-teller and his audience / Ruth Scodel -- pt. 2. The characters. The Gods in the Homeric epics / Emily Kearns ; Manhood and heroism / Michael Clarke ; Gender and Homeric epic / Nancy Felson and Laura Slatkin -- pt. 3. The poet's craft. Formulas, metre and type-scenes / Matthew Clark ; Similes and other likenesses / Richard Buxton ; The speeches / Jasper Griffin -- pt. 4. Text and context. Epic as genre / John Miles Foley ; The epic tradition in Greece / Ken Dowden ; Homer's society / Robin Osborne ; The Homeric question / Robert Fowler -- pt. 5. Homeric receptions. Homer and Greek literature / Richard Hunter ; Roman Homer / Joseph Farrell ; Homer and English epic / Penelope Wilson ; Homer and the Romantics / Timothy Webb ; Homer and Ulysses / Vanda Zajko ; Homer : the history of an idea / James I. Porter ; "Shards and suckers" : contemporary receptions of Homer / Lorna Hardwick ; Homer in English translation / George Steiner
 

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User Review  - Urquhart - LibraryThing

Anyone who loves Homer should definitely read this book as a required followup. However, the scholarly writers in the book should make a token effort at being more readable/accessible and less arcane ... Read full review

Contents

III
11
IV
31
V
45
VI
59
VII
74
VIII
91
IX
115
X
117
XVIII
133
XIX
135
XX
154
XXI
172
XXII
187
XXIII
311
XXIV
324
XXV
344

XI
139
XII
156
XIII
169
XIV
171
XV
188
XVI
106
XVII
120
XXVI
363
XXVII
376
XXVIII
378
XXIX
415
XXX
416
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Page 3 - As among the works of nature no man can properly call a river deep, or a mountain high, without the knowledge of many mountains and many rivers...
Page 4 - The Pythagorean scale of numbers was at once discovered to be perfect; but the poems of Homer we yet know not to transcend the common limits of human intelligence, but by remarking that nation after nation, and century after century, has been able to do little more than transpose his incidents, new-name his characters, and paraphrase his sentiments.
Page 3 - To works, however, of which the excellence is not absolute and definite, but gradual and comparative; to works not raised upon principles demonstrative and scientifick, but appealing wholly to observation and experience, no other test can be applied than length of duration and continuance of esteem.
Page 3 - Demonstration immediately displays its power and has nothing to hope or fear from the flux of years; but works tentative and experimental must be estimated by their proportion to the general and collective ability of man, as it is discovered in a long succession of endeavors.

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About the author (2004)

Robert Fowler is Henry Overton Wills Professor of Greek, University of Bristol. He is the author of The Nature of the Early Greek Lyric (1987). He has also edited Early Greek Mythology, Volume 1 (2001).

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