The Cambridge Companion to Homer

Front Cover
Robert Fowler, Robert Louis Fowler
Cambridge University Press, Oct 14, 2004 - History - 419 pages
The Cambridge Companion to Homer is a guide to the essential aspects of Homeric criticism and scholarship, including the reception of the poems in ancient and modern times. Written by an international team of scholars, it is intended to be the first port of call for students at all levels, with introductions to important subjects and suggestions for further exploration. Alongside traditional topics like the Homeric Question, the divine apparatus of the poems, the formulae, the characters and the archaeological background, there are detailed discussions of similes, speeches, the poet as story-teller and the genre of epic both within Greece and worldwide. The reception chapters include assessments of ancient Greek and Roman readings as well as selected modern interpretations from the eighteenth century to the present day. Chapters on Homer in English translation and 'Homer' in the history of ideas round out the collection.
 

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User Review  - Urquhart - LibraryThing

Anyone who loves Homer should definitely read this book as a required followup. However, the scholarly writers in the book should make a token effort at being more readable/accessible and less arcane ... Read full review

Contents

III
11
IV
31
V
45
VI
59
VII
74
VIII
91
IX
115
X
117
XVIII
233
XIX
235
XX
254
XXI
272
XXII
287
XXIII
311
XXIV
324
XXV
344

XI
139
XII
156
XIII
169
XIV
171
XV
188
XVI
206
XVII
220
XXVI
363
XXVII
376
XXVIII
378
XXIX
415
XXX
416
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Page 3 - As among the works of nature no man can properly call a river deep, or a mountain high, without the knowledge of many mountains and many rivers...
Page 4 - The Pythagorean scale of numbers was at once discovered to be perfect; but the poems of Homer we yet know not to transcend the common limits of human intelligence, but by remarking that nation after nation, and century after century, has been able to do little more than transpose his incidents, new-name his characters, and paraphrase his sentiments.
Page 3 - To works, however, of which the excellence is not absolute and definite, but gradual and comparative; to works not raised upon principles demonstrative and scientifick, but appealing wholly to observation and experience, no other test can be applied than length of duration and continuance of esteem.
Page 3 - Demonstration immediately displays its power and has nothing to hope or fear from the flux of years; but works tentative and experimental must be estimated by their proportion to the general and collective ability of man, as it is discovered in a long succession of endeavors.

About the author (2004)

Robert Fowler is Henry Overton Wills Professor of Greek, University of Bristol. He is the author of The Nature of the Early Greek Lyric (1987). He has also edited Early Greek Mythology, Volume 1 (2001).

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