The Countess and Gertrude; Or, Modes of Discipline, Volume 3

Front Cover
F.C. and J. Rivington, 1812
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 33 - For loyalty is still the same Whether it win or lose the game ; True as the dial to the sun, Although it be not shin'd upon.
Page 27 - Thus this pattern of meekness and primitive innocence changed this for a better life. 'Tis now too late to wish that mine may be like his ; for I am in the eighty-fifth year of my age, and God knows it hath not : but I most humbly beseech Almighty God, that my death may : and I do as earnestly beg, that if any reader shall receive any satisfaction from this very plain, and as true relation, he will be so charitable as to say, Amen.
Page 27 - Thus, this pattern of meekness and primitive innocence changed this for a better life : 'tis now too late to wish that mine may be like his, (for I am in the eighty-fifth year of my age, and God knows it hath not) ; but I most humbly beseech Almighty God that my death may : and I do as earnestly beg, that if any reader shall receive any satisfaction from this very plain, and as true relation, he will be so charitable as to say Amen.
Page 385 - And blasts the melancholy year; For times at no persuasion stay, Nor vice can find perpetual May; Then where's that tongue, by folly fed, That soul of pertness, whither fled...
Page 21 - I hear not the rest be won to a right bye way to breed more traitor's stocks, and so the goal is gone. Make some difference between tried, just, and false friends. Let the good service of well deservers be never rewarded with loss. Let their thank be such as may encourage mo strivers for the like.
Page 385 - Thou wretch! (rejoin'd the kindling Dove), Quite lost to life, as lost to love, Whene'er misfortune comes, how just! And come misfortune surely must; In the dread season of dismay, In that your hour of trial, say, Who then shall prop your sinking heart, Who bear affliction's weightier part? ' Say, when the blackbrow'd welkin bends, And winter's gloomy form impends, To mourning turns all transient cheer, And blasts the melancholy year; For times...
Page 22 - ... used in these cases, I had never played my part. No, if I did not see the balances held awry, I had never myself come into the weigh-house. I hope I shall have so good a customer of you, that all other officers shall do their duty among you. If aught have been amiss at home, I will patch though I cannot whole it.
Page 385 - Shall turn the long-enduring night ; No bride her words of balm impart, And warm thee at her constant heart. Freedom, restrain'd by reason's force, Is as the sun's unvarying course ; Benignly active, sweetly bright, Affording warmth, affording light ; But, torn from virtue's sacred rules, Becomes a comet, gaz'd by fools, Foreboding cares, and storms, and strife, And fraught with all the plagues of life. Thou...
Page 42 - Steele did of a discourse of Dr. South's, that it has in it whatever wit and wisdom can put together ; and I will venture to add', that whoever sits down without prejudice, and attentively reads it through, will rise up the wiier Kan and better ckrutian.*
Page 40 - Centaurs within thee lie quiet. Chain up the unruly legion of thy breast. Lead thine own captivity captive, and be Ca;sar within thyself...

Bibliographic information