The Haitian Revolution: A Documentary History

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Hackett Publishing, Sep 3, 2014 - History - 262 pages
"A landmark collection of documents by the field's leading scholar. This reader includes beautifully written introductions and a fascinating array of never-before-published primary documents. These treasures from the archives offer a new picture of colonial Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution. The translations are lively and colorful." --Alyssa Sepinwall, California State University San Marcos
 

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Contents

1 SAINT DOMINGUE ON THE EVE OF REVOLUTION
1
1 Greed and Decadence
3
2 The Plantation Hierarchy
4
3 A Slave Traders View
6
4 Plantation Slaves
7
5 The Lejeune Atrocity Case
10
Official
12
Unofficial
14
50 Royalism Republicanism and Freedom
111
51 France Abolishes Slavery
112
53 The Fort Dauphin Massacre 7 July 1794
114
7 THE RISE OF TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE
117
54 Toussaints Early Life
120
55 Toussaint the Royalist
122
56 Toussaint the Abolitionist
123
57 Rivalry with Biassou
126

2 SLAVE RESISTANCE
15
8 Satirical Song
17
10 Macandal the Poisoner
19
11 Vodou and Petro
20
12 Vodou and the Underworld
22
13 Prophet or Crook? The Real Don Pedro
24
14 Slaves on Strike
25
15 DaytoDay Resistance on a Mountain Plantation
29
16 Runaway Advertisements
33
3 THE RACE AND SLAVERY QUESTIONS IN THE FRENCH NATIONAL ASSEMBLY
36
17 The Enlightenment Race and Slavery
39
18 The Founding of the Friends of the Blacks
40
19 Fear of Emancipation and Revolt
43
20 A Free Man of Colors Complaints
44
21 Free People of Color Organize
46
22 The Abbé Grégoires Violent Rhetoric
47
23 Ogé Addresses the Planters Club
48
24 Support from the Provincial Jacobin Clubs
50
25 The May 1791 Debates
51
4 THE FIGHT FOR RACIAL EQUALITY IN SAINT DOMINGUE
57
26 Early Atrocities
59
27 Free Coloreds Petition the Assembly of the North 10 November 1789
61
28 The Rebellion of Ogé and Chavanne
62
29 The Sentencing of Ogé and Chavanne
64
30 The August 1791 Rising in the West
65
31 The Peace Treaty of 1923 October 1791
68
32 Call to Arms of the Free Men of Color late November 1791
70
5 THE SLAVE INSURRECTION
72
33 Slaves Reaction to the French Revolution
75
The Lenormand Meeting
77
35 The Bois Caïman Ceremony
78
36 The Uprising Begins
79
37 The Slave Insurgents Make Demands
82
38 A White Captives Experiences
83
39 The Slave Leaders Negotiate
86
40 The Negotiations Break Down
89
41 Women in Rebellion
91
The Caïmittes Rebellion
93
43 Black Tactics White Responses
94
6 SLAVE EMANCIPATION
98
44 The Colonists Fear of Sonthonax September 1792
101
45 Sonthonaxs Early Advocacy of Slave Emancipation
102
47 Spains Offer to the Insurgent Slaves
105
48 The Emancipation Proclamation of 29 August 1793
107
49 The Black Auxiliaries of Carlos IV
109
58 Toussaint and Laveaux
128
59 Toussaint and the ExSlaves
129
60 A British Soldiers Diary
132
61 The Fall of PortauPrince May 1798
133
62 The Expulsion of Sonthonax
135
8 THE GOVERNMENT OF TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE
139
63 Toussaint Confronts His Critics
143
64 Toussaint and Agent Hédouville
146
65 The War of the South
148
66 Plantation Labor in the Southeast
151
67 Toussaints Labor Decree
153
68 A British Visitor
154
69 Roumes Praise for the Cultivators
158
71 Toussaint Louvertures Constitution July 1801
160
72 Moyses Rebellion
164
73 Proclamation 4 Frimaire X
166
9 THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE
168
74 Bonaparte on Slave Emancipation
171
75 General Leclerc and the Restoration of Slavery
172
76 Toussaint in Captivity
174
77 US Newspaper Reports
175
78 Collaboration and Revolt
176
79 Atrocities
178
80 The Declaration of Independence 1 January 1804
179
81 Dessalines Proclamation 28 April 1804
180
10 OVERSEAS REACTIONS
183
82 Jamaican Slaves 1791
186
84 Troublesome Migrants in Puerto Rico 1796
187
85 Jamaican Song 1799
188
87 Brazilian Militiamen 1805
189
The British Press 1791
191
90 Greed and Fear in Cuba
192
Abraham Bishop 1791
193
92 Samuel Whitchurch Hispaniola a Poem 1804
194
93 An Anguished Thomas Jefferson
195
The Disillusioned Idealist
197
95 The Impact of Independence
199
The Haitian Peril Abolition and Race
200
An Early Historian
201
98 William Wordsworth To Toussaint LOuverture
202
99 Frederick Douglass Lecture on Haiti 1893
203
Bibliography
206
Index
209
Back Cover
213
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

David Geggus is Professor of History, University of Florida.

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