A New and General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an ... Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation in the World, Particularly the British and Irish ...

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The Proprietors, 1795 - Biography
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Page 239 - He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales" the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his age.
Page 239 - The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours and callings, that each of them would be improper in any other mouth.
Page 160 - The first prize was .50, for which, being but newly acquainted with wealth, and thinking the influence of .50 extremely great, he expected the first authors of the kingdom to appear as competitors ; and offered the allotment of the prize to the universities. But when the time came, no name was seen among the writers that had ever been seen before...
Page 124 - ... at Edgehill, when the enemy was routed, he was like to have incurred great peril, by interposing to save those who had thrown away their arms, and against whom, it may be, others were more fierce for their having thrown them away : so that a man might think, he came into the field chiefly out of curiosity to see the face of danger, and charity to prevent the shedding of blood.
Page 123 - He was constant and pertinacious in whatsoever he resolved to do, and not to be wearied by any pains that were necessary to that end. And therefore, having once resolved not to see London, which he loved above all places, till he had perfectly learned the Greek tongue, he went to his own house in the country, and pursued it with that indefatigable industry, that it will not be believed in how short a time he was master of it, and accurately read all the Greek historians.
Page 123 - ... that the speaker might, in the name of the whole house, give him thanks ; and then that every member might, as a testimony of his particular acknowledgment, stir, or move his hat towards him...
Page 123 - He was a great cherisher of wit and fancy and good parts in any man; and, if he found them clouded with poverty or want, a most liberal and bountiful patron towards them, even above his fortune...
Page 231 - His constitution refused him the usual pleasures, and his genius forbad him the idle dissipations, of youth ; for so early as at the age of sixteen he was the martyr of an hereditary gout. He therefore employed the leisure, which that tedious and painful distemper either procured or allowed him, in acquiring a great fund of premature and useful knowledge.
Page 238 - Tis true, I cannot go so far as he who published the last edition of him; for he would make us believe the fault is in our ears, and that there were really ten syllables in a verse...
Page 123 - ... recompense, instead of moving his hat, stretched both his arms out, and clasped his hands together upon the crown of his hat, and held it close down to his head ; that all men might see how odious that flattery was to him, and the very approbation of the person, though at that time most popular.

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