The Crusades: The Story of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem

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T. Fisher Unwin, 1894 - Crusades - 467 pages
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Page 302 - Jerusalem was the one outpost of the Latin Church and Latin culture in the East; it was the creation of those heroes of the first Crusade whose exploits had already become the theme of more than one romance; it lay on the verge of that mysterious East with all its wealth of gold and precious stones and merchandise, towards which the sword of the twelfthcentury knight turned as instinctively as the prow of the English or Spanish adventurer four centuries later turned towards the West. . . . Thus Palestine...
Page 429 - Be this as it may, there can be no doubt that the "Psalm of Life...
Page 421 - The old order changeth, yielding place to new, And God fulfils himself in many ways, Lest one good custom should corrupt the world Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me?
Page 218 - O thou sword of the Lord, how long will it be ere thou be quiet ? Put up thyself into thy scabbard ; rest and be still. How can it be quiet, seeing the Lord hath given it a charge against Ashkelon, and against the sea-shore ? There hath He appointed it.
Page 57 - Where shall I hide my forehead and my eyes ? For now I see the true old times are dead, When every morning brought a noble chance, And every chance brought out a noble knight.
Page 172 - it is a shame for a man to have long hair.' They never dress gaily, and wash but seldom. Shaggy by reason of their uncombed hair, they are also begrimed with dust, and swarthy from the weight of their armour and the heat of the sun.
Page 75 - And lay siege against it, and build a fort against it, and cast a mount against it ; set the camp also against it, and set battering rams against it round about.
Page 363 - A brave man struggling with the storms of fate, And greatly falling with a falling state.
Page 172 - They never dress gaily, and wash but seldom. Shaggy by reason of their uncombed hair, they are also begrimed with dust, and swarthy from the weight of their armour and the heat of the sun. They strive earnestly to possess strong and swift horses, but not garnished with ornaments or decked with trappings, thinking of battle and victory, not of pomp and show. Such hath God chosen for His own, who vigilantly and faithfully guard the Holy Sepulchre, all armed with the sword, and most learned in the art...
Page 234 - Saladin was but an unruly vassal. Still the time was only deferred when the valleys of the Orontes and Nile would own but one master in fact and in name. When that day arrived no human power could well have saved the kingdom of Jerusalem from its fate. XVI. THE RIVAL KINGS — NUR-ED-DIN AND AMALRIC (1163-1174.) " The fierce joy that warriors feel In foemen worthy of their steel.

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