The Fellowship of the Ring

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 2002 - Baggins, Frodo (Fictitious character) - 410 pages
166 Reviews
The Fellowship of the Ring is the first part of JRR Tolkien's epic masterpiece The Lord of the Rings, beautifully reset and lavishly illustrated by world-renowned Tolkien artist Alan Lee. Sauron, the Dark Lord, has gathered to him all the Rings of Power -- the means by which he intends to rule Middle-earth. All he lacks in his plans for dominion is the One Ring -- the ring that rules them all -- which has fallen into the hands of the hobbit, Bilbo Baggins. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

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User Review  - Daniel.Estes - LibraryThing

When The Fellowship of the Ring was first published in 1954 it was, profoundly, a story way ahead of its time. Or possibly it shaped the the course of time by its sheer cultural resonance alone? Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lori_Eshleman - LibraryThing

I returned to The Lord of the Rings after first reading it voraciously in college many years ago. It was interesting to read this first part with the knowledge and experience I now have, including the ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

J.R.R. Tolkien is best known for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, selling 150 million copies in more than 60 languages worldwide. He died in 1973 at the age of 81.
Christopher Tolkien is the third son of J.R.R. Tolkien. Appointed by J.R.R. Tolkien to be his literary executor, he has devoted himself to the publication of his father's unpublished writings, notably The Silmarillion and The History of Middle-earth.

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