Style and Idea: Selected Writings of Arnold Schoenberg

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University of California Press, 1975 - Biography & Autobiography - 559 pages
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One of the most influential collections of music ever published, Style and Idea includes Schoenberg’s writings about himself and his music as well as studies of many other composers and reflections on art and society.

 

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Contents

Editors Preface page
11
Translators Preface
17
On my Fiftieth Birthday 1924
23
Honorary Citizenship of Vienna 1949
29
Heart and Brain in Music 1946
53
A SelfAnalysis 1948
76
The Young and I 1923
92
New Music Outmoded Music Style and Idea 1946
113
The Future of Orchestral Instruments 1924
322
Mechanical Musical Instruments 1926
326
Instrumentation 1931
330
The Future of the Opera 1927
336
Aphorisms c 1930
337
Performance Indications Dynamics 1923
340
Musical Dynamics 1929
341
About Metronome Markings 1926
342

Criteria for the Evaluation of Music 1946
124
New Music 1923
137
This is my Fault 1949
145
Reply to a Questionnaire 1930
147
SpaceSound Vibrato Radio etc 1931
148
Modern Music on the Radio 1933
151
Art and the Moving Pictures 1940
153
FOLKMUSIC AND NATIONALISM
159
Folkloristic Symphonies 1947
161
FolkMusic and ArtMusic c 1926
167
National Music 1 1931
169
National Music 2 1931
172
Italian National Music 1927
175
Why No Great American Music? 1934
176
CRITICS AND CRITICISM
183
A Legal Question 1909
185
An Artistic Impression 1909
189
About Music Criticism 1909
191
Sleepwalker 1912
197
The Music Critic 1912
198
Musical Historians c 1915
201
Those who Complain about the Decline 1923
203
TWELVETONE COMPOSITION
205
TwelveTone Composition 1923
207
Hauers Theories 1923
209
Schoenbergs ToneRows 1936
213
Composition with Twelve Tones 1 1941
214
Composition with Twelve Tones 2 c 1948
245
Is it Fair? 1947
249
THEORY AND COMPOSITION
251
Theory of Form 1924
253
Tonality and Form 1925
255
Opinion or Insight? 1926
258
For a Treatise on Composition 1931
264
Problems of Harmony 1934
268
Connection of Musical Ideas c 1948
287
Old and New Counterpoint 1928
288
Linear Counterpoint 1931
289
Linear Polyphony 1931
295
Fugue 1936
297
About Ornaments Primitive Rhythms etc and Bird Song 1922
298
Ornaments and Construction 1923
312
Glosses on the Theories of Others 1929
313
PERFORMANCE AND NOTATION
317
For a Treatise on Performance 1923 or 1924
319
Todays Manner of Performing Classical Music 1948
320
Transposition 1923
343
Vibrato c 1940
345
Phrasing 1931
347
The Modern Piano Reduction 1923
348
On Notation 1923
350
Pictorial Notation 1923
351
RevolutionEvolution Notation Accidentals 1931
353
A New TwelveTone Notation 1924
354
TEACHING
363
Problems in Teaching Art 1911
365
Music fromGuideLines for a Ministry of Art 1919
369
On the Question of Modern Composition Teaching 1929
373
Teaching and Modern Trends in Music 1938
376
Eartraining through Composing 1939
377
The Blessing of the Dressing 1948
382
Against the Specialist c 1940
387
The Task of the Teacher 1950
388
COMPOSERS
391
Bach 1950
393
Brahms the Progressive 1947
398
Franz Liszts Work and Being 1911
442
In Memoriam 1912
447
Gustav Mahler 1912 1948
449
Robert Schumann as Critic 1931
472
Alban Berg 1 1949
474
Alban Berg 2 1930
475
George Gershwin 1938
476
Kreneks Sprung iiber den Schatten 1923
477
Der Restaurateur 1926
481
Stravinskys Oedipus 1928
482
Foreword to his Six Bagatelles 1924
483
Klangfarbenmelodie 1951
484
Zemlinsky 1921
486
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL MATTERS
489
Parsifal and Copyright 1912
491
Copyright 1949
497
Successthe End of Bohemianism 1928
499
Does the World Lack a PeaceHymn? 1928
500
Two Speeches on the Jewish Situation 1934 and 1935
501
My Attitude toward Politics 1950
505
Human Rights 1947
506
Sources and Notes
513
Appendices
537
Index
553
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

An American of Austrian birth, Arnold Schoenberg composed initially in a highly developed romantic style but eventually turned to painting and expressionism. At first he was influenced by Richard Wagner and tried to write in a Wagnerian style. He attracted the attention of Alban Berg and Anton von Webern, with whom he created a new compositional method based on using all 12 half-steps in each octave as an organizing principle, the so-called 12-tone technique. His importance to the development of twentieth-century music is incredible, but the music he composed using this new method is not easily accessible to most concertgoers.

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