What I Know, Or, Hints on the Daily Duties of a Housekeeper: Comprising Nearly Five Hundred Receipts, for Cooking, Preserving, Pickling, Washing, Ironing, Gardening, Plain and Fancy Needle-work, Putting Up of Winter Stores, and Numerous Other Receipts Useful and Needful in Every Well-regulated Household

Front Cover
W. P. Hazard, 1856 - Cookery - 156 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 93 - Vegetables will keep best on a stone floor, if the air be excluded. — Meat in a cold dry place. — Sugar and sweetmeats require a dry place; so does salt. — Candles cold, but not damp. — Dried meats, hams, &c. the same. — All sorts of seeds for puddings, saloop, rice, &c. should be close covered, to preserve from insects; but that will not prevent it, if long kept.
Page 31 - ... of oysters. Serve it with the gravy in the dish. A large fish should be allowed an hour, small ones half an hour. To Broil Shad. Soak a salt shad a day or night previous to cooking, it is best to drain an hour before you put it to the fire; if it hangs long exposed to the air, it loses its flavor: grease the gridiron to keep it from sticking; have good coals, and put the inside down first. Fresh shad is better to be sprinkled with salt, an hour before it is put to broil; put a plate over the...
Page 89 - ... syrup of a pound of sugar and half a pint of water to a pound of fruit; clarify and skim it, then put in the apples and let them cook gently for half an hour; if you do not want to keep them long, much less sugar will do. Blackberries. Allow a pint of currant juice and a pint of water to six pounds of blackberries; give them their weight in brown sugar ; let them boil till they appear to be done, and the syrup is rich. Blackberry jelly can be made as currant jelly, and is good for sick children,...
Page 108 - Steep the plate in soap leys for the space of four hours; then cover it over with whiting, wet with vinegar, so that it may stick thick upon it, and dry it by a fire; after which, rub off the whiting, and pass it over with dry bran, and the spots will not only disappear, but the plate will look exceedingly bright.
Page 150 - The best manure for vines is the branches pruned from the vines themselves, cut into small pieces, and immediately mixed with the soil. These branches were used as manure long since in the Bergstrasse. M. Frauenfelder says : * I remember that twenty years ago, a man called Peter Miiller had a vineyard here which he manured with the branches pruned from the vines, and continued this practice...
Page 66 - ... and well mashed, put the whites of three eggs, well beaten, and four table-spoons heaping full of loaf sugar, heat them together for fifteen minutes, and eat with rich milk and nutmeg. Carrageen or Irish Moss Blancmange. Wash in three waters half an ounce of Carrageen moss; drain and put it in two quarts of new milk, let it boil for a few minutes, strain it in a pitcher, wet the moulds, and pour it in while hot; let it stand till it becomes thick, when it may be eaten with sugar and cream, seasoned...
Page 17 - SOUPS. The delicate and proper blending of savours is the chief art of good soup-making. Be sure to skim the grease off the soup when it first boils, or it will not become clear. Throw in a little salt to bring up the scum. Remove ALL the fat. Be careful to simmer softly, and never allow a soup to boil hard.
Page 116 - ... water, and held or hung up, for the superfluous moisture to run from it ; and, when this has sufficiently taken place, it is laid between sheets of white French blotting-paper, and covered by a thick millboard, weights being laid on it, so as to have the effect of a moderate press, and it is thus left till dry. Where there is much soiling to be removed, and of old standing, it may be allowable to use, gently and carefully, a soft hair brush, while the print is saturated with the water, to assist...
Page 35 - Early peas require about half an hour to boil, and the later kinds rather longer; the water should boil when they are put in ; when they are tough and yellow, they may be made tender and green, by putting in a little pearl-ash, or ashes tied up in a rag, just before they are taken up ; this will tender all green vegetables, but do not put too much; — when done, dip them out; drain and season them with butter, pepper and salt; put a bunch of parsley in the middle of the dish. To Keep Green Beans...
Page 86 - Put two tea- spoonsful of ground coffee in a small mug, and pour boiling water on it ; let it set by the fire to settle, and pour it off in a cup, with sugar and cream. Care should be taken that there are no burnt grains. Chocolate, To make a cup of chocolate, grate a large teaspoonful in a mug, and pour a tea-cup of boiling water on it; let it stand covered by the fire a few minutes, when you can put in sugar and cream. Black Tea. Black tea is much more suitable than green for sick persons, as it...

Bibliographic information