Population Genetics: A Concise Guide

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JHU Press, Dec 29, 2010 - Science - 232 pages
3 Reviews

This concise introduction offers students and researchers an overview of the discipline that connects genetics and evolution. Addressing the theories behind population genetics and relevant empirical evidence, John Gillespie discusses genetic drift, natural selection, nonrandom mating, quantitative genetics, and the evolutionary advantage of sex. First published to wide acclaim in 1998, this brilliant primer has been updated to include new sections on molecular evolution, genetic drift, genetic load, the stationary distribution, and two-locus dynamics. This book is indispensable for students working in a laboratory setting or studying free-ranging populations.

 

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User Review  - amarcobio - LibraryThing

I don't agree with Gillespie vision of evolutionarily biology. Perhaps for that reason I've been postponing reading this book. Now that I read it, I think is one of the best resources to learn ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

群体遗传学入门
叙述了群体遗传学的基本理论。
通过相关公式的推导,展示了其中的数学简约之美。(尽管有时候作者也觉得不是太美^_^)
看不懂公式也不要紧,作者也描述了很多从公式引出的理论推断,它们都很有实际意义。

Contents

Genetic Variation
1
Figures
3
Genetic Drift
21
Natural Selection
59
TwoLocus Dynamics
101
Nonrandom Mating
119
Quantitative Genetics
139
The Evolutionary Advantage of Sex
169
Appendix A Mathematical Necessities
185
Bibliography
207
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Page xii - Kimura, M. and Ohta, T. (1971) 'Protein Polymorphism as a Phase of Molecular Evolution', Nature 229, 467^69.
Page xii - Deleterious Mutations and the Evolution of Sexual Reproduction', Nature 336: 435—440.
Page xi - There is no better example than genetic drift, the small random changes in genotype frequencies caused by variation in offspring number between individuals and, in diploids, genetic segregation.

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About the author (2010)

John H. Gillespie is a professor of evolution at the University of California, Davis.

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