Works of Washington Irving, Volume 24

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G.P. Putnam, 1862
 

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Page 226 - I fancy much of what I value myself upon in writing, escapes the observation of the great mass of my readers, who are intent more upon the story than the way in which it is told. For my part, I consider a story merely as a frame on which to stretch my materials.
Page 486 - I come from gloomier climates to one of brilliant sunshine and inspiring purity. I come from countries lowering with doubt and danger, where the rich man trembles and the poor man frowns— where all repine at the present and dread the future. I come from these, to a country where all is life and animation; where I hear on every side the sound of exultation; where every one speaks of the past with triumph, the present with delight, the future with growing and confident anticipation.
Page 473 - ... climate, fierce in its extremes, but splendid in all its vicissitudes. His close observation of the phenomena of nature and the graphic felicity of his details, prevent his descriptions from ever becoming general and commonplace ; while he has the gift of shedding over them a pensive grace that blends them all into harmony, and of clothing them with moral associations that make them speak to the heart. Neither, I am convinced, -will it be the least of his merits in your eyes, that his writings...
Page 486 - Is this not a city by which one may be proud to be received as the son ? Is this not a land in which one may be happy to fix his destiny, and his ambition — if possible — to found a name ? (A burst of applause, when Mr.
Page 86 - ... this fairy shrine, And pay the tribute of a song Where worth and loveliness combine, — What boots that I, a vagrant wight From clime to clime still wandering on, Upon thy friendly page should write — Who'll think of me when I am gone? Go plough the wave, and sow the sand ! Throw seed to ev'ry wind that blows ; Along the highway strew thy hand, And fatten on the crop that grows.
Page 221 - If you think my path has been a flowery one, you are greatly mistaken ; it has too often lain among thorns and brambles, and been darkened by care and despondency. Many and many a time have I regretted that at my early outset in life I had not been imperiously bound down to some regular and useful mode of life, and been thoroughly inured to habits of business ; and I have a thousand times regretted with bitterness that ever I was led away by my imagination. Believe me, the man who earns his bread...
Page 57 - You laugh," said he, with that air of whimsical significance so natural to him, "but it is true. I have kept that to myself hitherto, but that man has found me out. He has detected the moral of the Stout Gentleman.
Page 431 - The king and Mrs. McLane also had some pleasant discourse. * * In the evening there was a brilliant dress ball at the Duke of Wellington's, at which I was present. The king was there in great spirits, notwithstanding the busy day he had been through. He spoke to everybody right and left in the most affable manner, and I observe he has an easy and natural way of wiping his nose with the back of his forefinger, which I fancy is a relic of his old middy habits.
Page 227 - I have written will be oftener re-read than any novel of the size that I could have written. It is true other writers have crowded into the same branch of literature, and I now begin to find myself elbowed by men who have followed my footsteps; but at any rate I have had the merit of adopting a line for myself instead of following others.
Page 485 - As to my native city, from the time I approached the coast I had indications of its growing greatness. "We had scarce descried the land, when a thousand sails of all descriptions gleaming along the horizon, and all standing to or from one point, showed that we were in the neighborhood of a vast commercial emporium. As I sailed up our beautiful bay, with a .heart swelling with old recollections and delightful associations, I was astonished to see its once wild features brightening with populous villages...

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