Theatre Australia (un)limited: Australian Theatre Since the 1950s

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Rodopi, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 444 pages
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Theatre Australia (Un)limited tells a truly national story of the structures of post-war Australian theatre: its artists, companies, financial and policy underpinnings. It gives an inclusive analysis of three 'waves' of Australian theatrical activity after 1953, and the types of organisations which grew up to support and maintain them. Subsidy, repertoire patterns, finances and administration, theatre buildings, companies, festivals and notable productions of the commercial, mainstream and alternative Australian theatre are examined state by state, and changes to governmental policy analysed. Theatrical forms comprise not only spoken-word drama, but also music theatre, comedy, theatre-restaurant, circus, puppetry, community theatre in several forms and new mixed-media genres: physical theatre, circus, visual theatre and contemporary performance.
Theatre Australia (Un)limited is the first comprehensive overview of the fortunes of Australian theatre as a national enterprise, providing the industrial analysis of the 'three waves' essential for the understanding of the New Wave and of contemporary drama.
 

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I have not read the book just googled the excerpt on the theatre company I was co artistic director of. The comments on Sowoddyawant Womens Theatre Company are incorrect. The company hired Patricia Cornelius and Lisa Dombroski to work for them. It was just not their collaboration as such.
The company had already worked in prison for two years and workshopped and developed theatre with the women incarcerated and Inside Out was after this. Also the professional actors in the show are acknowledged what is not valued or acknowledged is the Sowoddyawant Womens Theatre Company members who were professional actors in the show and also the Artistic Directors and members of Sowoddyawant Womens Theatre Company who worked on all aspects of this production from scratch and I reiterate hired Lisa and Patricia who we knew and loved. Furthermore the company was not soley focused on working in prison and had developed and performed original work.
 

Contents

Prologue
1
Chapter i
10
Chapters
20
Chapter 3
40
Chapter 4
74
Chapter 5
82
state government infrastructure
100
Chapter 7
109
Chapter 13
217
Chapter 14
235
Chapter 15
260
Chapter 16
277
professional cooperative companies
299
Chapter 18
318
Chapter 19
335
Chapter 20
355

Chapter 8
123
Chapter 9
152
Chapter jo
165
Chapter 11
188
Chapter 12
200
Chapter 21
375
Epilogue
392
Wbris cited
403
Index
413
Copyright

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Page 21 - Commission are— (a) to furnish advice to the Minister, either of its own motion or upon request made to it by the Minister, on matters relating to the national estate...
Page 21 - ... to do anything incidental or conducive to the performance of any of the preceding functions.
Page 11 - Trust, one notes that their ultimate aim is 'to establish a native drama, opera and ballet which will give professional employment to Australian actors, singers and dancers, and furnish opportunities for those, such as writers, composers and artists, whose creative work is related to the theatre.
Page 21 - ... to encourage the support of the arts by the States, local governing bodies and other persons and organisations.
Page 21 - promote excellence in the arts ; provide and encourage the provision of opportunities for persons to practise the arts ; promote the appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of the arts...

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About the author (2004)

Geoffrey Milne is head of Theatre and Drama at La Trobe University, Melbourne. He has worked in theatre since 1967 in many capacities, especially as a lighting designer, and since the mid 1980s as a theatre reviewer for print and radio. His book on puppetry in Australia The Space Between, written with puppeteer Peter J. Wilson, will be published by Currency Press in 2004.
Veronica Kelly is Director of the Australian Drama Studies Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane.

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