Essential French Grammar

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1965 - Foreign Language Study - 145 pages
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This is the first French grammar designed specifically for adults with limited learning time who wish to acquire a knowledge of simple, everyday spoken French, and who have no need of all the archaic, highly literary, and seldom used forms that must be covered in a conventional grammar. It is not a simplified study, but a selective grammar that points out many time-saving short cuts.
Constantly drawing comparisons with English construction, it covers all of the important points in French grammar (verb forms and tenses, parts of speech, negative sentences, possessives, partitive construction, etc.) fully and logically, and with refreshing clarity. It was created for those who prefer the phrase approach, and all grammatical points are illustrated with phrases and sentences that you can incorporate directly into your working vocabulary. Many of the discussions include a list of common expressions that use the rule under study.
In addition to the grammar text itself, there are several unusual features of great value to anyone who wants to build a French vocabulary: a section on common word-endings and their French equivalents, for example, and a 50-page lit of French-English cognates.
This grammar does not assume any previous knowledge either of grammatical terms or of French grammar. English grammatical terms are explained in a separate section and all discussion begins with essentials and works up from there. Use it as an introduction to grammar, for independent class courses, with phrase courses, as a refresher, or for beginning self-study.
 

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Contents

III
15
IV
16
V
17
VI
18
VII
20
VIII
21
IX
22
XI
23
XLIX
56
LI
57
LII
58
LIII
61
LV
62
LVI
63
LVIII
64
LIX
65

XII
24
XIII
25
XV
26
XVII
27
XVIII
29
XIX
30
XXII
31
XXIII
32
XXV
34
XXVI
36
XXVII
37
XXIX
38
XXX
39
XXXII
41
XXXIV
42
XXXV
43
XXXVI
44
XXXVII
45
XXXVIII
47
XXXIX
48
XLI
49
XLII
50
XLIV
51
XLV
53
XLVI
54
XLVII
55
LX
66
LXI
68
LXII
69
LXIII
71
LXIV
72
LXVII
73
LXVIII
74
LXX
75
LXXI
76
LXXIII
78
LXXIV
79
LXXVI
80
LXXVII
82
LXXVIII
83
LXXX
84
LXXXI
85
LXXXIII
86
LXXXVI
88
LXXXVII
89
LXXXVIII
91
LXXXIX
92
XCI
95
XCII
131
XCIII
141
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Page 13 - or a good travel phrase book will give you the material you need. Select material according to your personal interests and requirements. If you don't plan to motor, don't spend time studying the parts of the car. If you like foreign foods, study the supplementary
Page 10 - systematically without an understanding of its grammar, and the use and understanding of grammatical terms is as essential as a knowledge of certain mechanical terms when you learn to drive a car. If your knowledge of grammatical terms is weak, read the Glossary of Grammatical Terms (p.¿
Page 11 - you will be your own best judge of the areas in which you need help in grammatical construction. If there is no one with whom to practice, speak mentally to yourself. In the course of a day see how many of the simple thoughts you've expressed in English can be stated in some manner in
Page 9 - which will enable you to use more effectively and with greater versatility phrases and vocabulary that you have previously learned. You will become familiar with the more common structures and patterns of the language and learn a selected number of the most useful rules and forms. How to Study Essential
Page 13 - Even if you do not plan to travel in the near future, you will probably learn more quickly by imagining a travel or real life situation. 2. Use the association technique for memorization. For the most part, Listen
Page 13 - i. Study words and word lists that answer real and preferably immediate personal needs. If you are planning to travel in the near future your motivation and orientation is clear cut and Listen & Learn

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